Coffee

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Expand view Topic review: Coffee

Re: Coffee

by Blue Frost » August 31st, 2021, 11:35 am

Well if you wanted to quit you can just cut back on the serving size each morning.
One cups is not bad though, and coffee does have a little good.

Re: Coffee

by Gary Oak » August 29th, 2021, 9:04 pm

I only drink coffee in the morning and then don’t touch caffein until the next morning.so I can get that morning wake up blast off for the day. It works but caffeine withdrawal is not enjoyable.

Re: Coffee

by Blue Frost » August 29th, 2021, 7:16 pm

It does dehydrate you, and that's why some drink it all day long.
I think coffee should be just a treat occasionally, but that's my opinion which means nothing.
I drink water first thing in the morning, and most the day, sometimes fruit juice, or teas.

Re: Coffee

by Reverse Flash » August 29th, 2021, 6:36 pm

I have been having coffee daily. Tried not to but I'm always tired and sleepy. That kick only last for about 1.5 hours. I feel like coffee dehydrates your body.

Re: Coffee

by Blue Frost » July 31st, 2021, 2:41 pm

When I make Chicken noodle soup, I add extra bullion, and less water so it's richer :yum2:
I eat the chicken, and noodles, and enjoy the soup as a drink.

Re: Coffee

by Twilight turtle » July 31st, 2021, 6:52 am

Oh yeah, I forgot about soup... on a cold winter's night.

Re: Coffee

by Blue Frost » July 30th, 2021, 5:26 pm

I don't care for any hot drinks unless it's chicken noodle soup, or something with beef. :)
How Chocolate I have to have a ton of marshmallows.
I like cold teas, Sun tea is best with lemon in it. :)

Re: Coffee

by Twilight turtle » July 30th, 2021, 5:46 am

Not a big coffee drinker... just a cup sometimes and a change from tea. Don't seem to be many hot drinks really other than hot choc, nice but full of sugar that. :kez:

Re: Coffee

by Gary Oak » July 30th, 2021, 12:29 am

I’m studying ways to make me feel good about my caffeine addiction. :cofferoll: :coffee:

Re: Coffee

by Renee » July 29th, 2021, 10:36 am

Gary Oak wrote: April 15th, 2018, 11:39 am Seeing as it is very painful to quit, I am always happy to hear of good things coffee does :pardon:

Coffee Causes Widespread Brain Entropy
and that's a good thing

Basic neuroscience teaches us how individual brain cells communicate with each other, like neighbours chatting over the garden fence. This is a vital part of brain function. Increasingly however neuroscientists are zooming out and studying the information processing that happens within and between neural networks across the entire brain, more akin to the complex flow of digital information constantly pulsing around the globe.

This has led them to realise the importance of what they call “brain entropy” – intense complexity and irregular variability in brain activity from one moment to the next, also marked by greater long-distance correlations in neural activity. Greater entropy, up to a point, is indicative of more information processing capacity, as opposed to low entropy – characterised by orderliness and repetition – which is seen when we are in a deep sleep or coma.

A new study in Scientific Reports is the first to examine whether and how ingesting a psychostimulant – in this case caffeine – affects brain entropy. The results show caffeine causes a widespread increase in cerebral entropy. This dose of neural anarchy is probably welcome, especially considered in light of another new paper, in PLOS One, which finds greater brain entropy correlates with higher verbal IQ and reasoning ability.


For the caffeine study, Da Chang at Hangzhou Normal University in China and other researchers scanned the brains of 60 participants – 30 men and women – at baseline, and also after they ingested a 200mg caffeine pill (roughly approximate to two cups of coffee). It was a “resting-state” scan meaning that the participants simply lay in the scanner doing nothing. For both scans, Chang’s team analysed changing neural activity levels from one moment to the next, and looked for correlations in activity across and within brain regions to calculate brain entropy. They also measured changes in cerebral blood flow across the brain.

The scans showed that caffeine increased brain entropy across nearly the entire cerebral cortex, but especially in “lateral prefrontal cortex, the DMN [default mode network, involving in day-dreaming and self-reflection], visual cortex, and motor network”, which the researchers linked to caffeine’s known beneficial effects on “attention, vigilance, and action/motion function.” There was little correlation locally between increased entropy and cerebral blood flow (which was reduced by caffeine), suggesting the effects of the caffeine were via influences on neuronal function, rather than due to vascular changes.

“Increased resting brain entropy indicates increased resting brain activity irregularity or complexity, suggesting an increase of information processing capacity in the resting brain,” the researchers said.

Meanwhile, a separate group led by Glenn Saxe at New York University’s School of Medicine used the same methods as Chang’s team to measure brain entropy in 900 healthy participants, who also completed measures of their verbal intelligence and reasoning ability outside of the scanner. The New York researchers defined brain entropy as “a measure of the brain’s overall flexibility or readiness to encounter unpredictable stimuli” and they found that it correlated with intelligence.

Specifically, superior vocabulary performance was associated with greater resting-state entropy in the left inferior frontal lobe, while superior reasoning ability was associated with greater entropy in that same region, but also in bilateral prefrontal areas.

Saxe and his colleagues said that “entropy in this context provides an indicator of the brain’s general readiness to process unpredictable stimuli from the environment” – a brain with greater entropy may in effect be better able to model and predict the outcomes of a complex, chaotic world. The researchers added, though, that they had not measured “the active use of brain states during a particular task”. Indeed, follow up research is now needed to see how brain entropy varies during performance of specific mental challenges, and how caffeine and other substances might affect entropy during such tasks.

In contrast to the entropy–intelligence association, participants’ age and years of education did not correlate with their IQ test scores. “These results suggest that entropy is a reliable predictor of intelligence, and provides unique information not captured by developmental status and educational status alone,” the researchers said.

The new findings add to past research measuring neural entropy that’s shown entropy is reduced in adults diagnosed with ADHD, for example, and in people addicted to cocaine. However, the story is not as simple as more entropy is good, less is bad. For instance, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia have greater neural entropy than healthy controls, perhaps indicative of “an underlying dysregulation of more complex functional networks”.

It will be interesting to see how the research on neural entropy develops in the future. For now, it is enough to marvel that as you enjoy your morning coffee, you are increasing the entropy throughout your brain – the bitter tonic is not merely waking you up, but apparently also boosting your brain’s useful anarchy, its complexity and information processing capacity.

—Caffeine Caused a Widespread Increase of Resting Brain Entropy

—Brain entropy and human intelligence: A resting-state fMRI study

Christian Jarrett (@Psych_Writer) is Editor of BPS Research Digest

https://digest.bps.org.uk/2018/04/10/ca ... ood-thing/
First of all so called "studies" are not science. They are manipulations designed to indicate a certain outcome that benefits a particular entity, theory or stakeholder.

One thing that did jump out at me was this statement..."In contrast to the entropy–intelligence association, participants’ age and years of education did not correlate with their IQ test scores."

In other words...Education does not always equate to intelligence...Unfortunately this becomes more and more evident with each passing generation.

Re: Coffee

by Gary Oak » July 27th, 2021, 1:27 am

I also am always on the lookout for reasons to drink coffee every morning.

Re: Coffee

by Blue Frost » July 26th, 2021, 10:26 am

I think I read a few cups are good for you, but so is some alcohol, fruit juice, and water even.
I don't drink coffee.

Re: Coffee

by Gary Oak » July 25th, 2021, 11:41 am

This is very bad news ! Those who drink six or more cups of coffee a day have an increased risk of developing dementia by 53% ! Fortunately my coffee consumption in the last few years has gone below six cups but this still is not good news. Apparently coffee shrinks the brain which can’t be healthy. This addiction is very painful to quit. https://justthenews.com/nation/science/ ... your-brain

Coffee

by Gary Oak » April 15th, 2018, 11:39 am

Seeing as it is very painful to quit, I am always happy to hear of good things coffee does :pardon:

Coffee Causes Widespread Brain Entropy
and that's a good thing

Basic neuroscience teaches us how individual brain cells communicate with each other, like neighbours chatting over the garden fence. This is a vital part of brain function. Increasingly however neuroscientists are zooming out and studying the information processing that happens within and between neural networks across the entire brain, more akin to the complex flow of digital information constantly pulsing around the globe.

This has led them to realise the importance of what they call “brain entropy” – intense complexity and irregular variability in brain activity from one moment to the next, also marked by greater long-distance correlations in neural activity. Greater entropy, up to a point, is indicative of more information processing capacity, as opposed to low entropy – characterised by orderliness and repetition – which is seen when we are in a deep sleep or coma.

A new study in Scientific Reports is the first to examine whether and how ingesting a psychostimulant – in this case caffeine – affects brain entropy. The results show caffeine causes a widespread increase in cerebral entropy. This dose of neural anarchy is probably welcome, especially considered in light of another new paper, in PLOS One, which finds greater brain entropy correlates with higher verbal IQ and reasoning ability.


For the caffeine study, Da Chang at Hangzhou Normal University in China and other researchers scanned the brains of 60 participants – 30 men and women – at baseline, and also after they ingested a 200mg caffeine pill (roughly approximate to two cups of coffee). It was a “resting-state” scan meaning that the participants simply lay in the scanner doing nothing. For both scans, Chang’s team analysed changing neural activity levels from one moment to the next, and looked for correlations in activity across and within brain regions to calculate brain entropy. They also measured changes in cerebral blood flow across the brain.

The scans showed that caffeine increased brain entropy across nearly the entire cerebral cortex, but especially in “lateral prefrontal cortex, the DMN [default mode network, involving in day-dreaming and self-reflection], visual cortex, and motor network”, which the researchers linked to caffeine’s known beneficial effects on “attention, vigilance, and action/motion function.” There was little correlation locally between increased entropy and cerebral blood flow (which was reduced by caffeine), suggesting the effects of the caffeine were via influences on neuronal function, rather than due to vascular changes.

“Increased resting brain entropy indicates increased resting brain activity irregularity or complexity, suggesting an increase of information processing capacity in the resting brain,” the researchers said.

Meanwhile, a separate group led by Glenn Saxe at New York University’s School of Medicine used the same methods as Chang’s team to measure brain entropy in 900 healthy participants, who also completed measures of their verbal intelligence and reasoning ability outside of the scanner. The New York researchers defined brain entropy as “a measure of the brain’s overall flexibility or readiness to encounter unpredictable stimuli” and they found that it correlated with intelligence.

Specifically, superior vocabulary performance was associated with greater resting-state entropy in the left inferior frontal lobe, while superior reasoning ability was associated with greater entropy in that same region, but also in bilateral prefrontal areas.

Saxe and his colleagues said that “entropy in this context provides an indicator of the brain’s general readiness to process unpredictable stimuli from the environment” – a brain with greater entropy may in effect be better able to model and predict the outcomes of a complex, chaotic world. The researchers added, though, that they had not measured “the active use of brain states during a particular task”. Indeed, follow up research is now needed to see how brain entropy varies during performance of specific mental challenges, and how caffeine and other substances might affect entropy during such tasks.

In contrast to the entropy–intelligence association, participants’ age and years of education did not correlate with their IQ test scores. “These results suggest that entropy is a reliable predictor of intelligence, and provides unique information not captured by developmental status and educational status alone,” the researchers said.

The new findings add to past research measuring neural entropy that’s shown entropy is reduced in adults diagnosed with ADHD, for example, and in people addicted to cocaine. However, the story is not as simple as more entropy is good, less is bad. For instance, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia have greater neural entropy than healthy controls, perhaps indicative of “an underlying dysregulation of more complex functional networks”.

It will be interesting to see how the research on neural entropy develops in the future. For now, it is enough to marvel that as you enjoy your morning coffee, you are increasing the entropy throughout your brain – the bitter tonic is not merely waking you up, but apparently also boosting your brain’s useful anarchy, its complexity and information processing capacity.

—Caffeine Caused a Widespread Increase of Resting Brain Entropy

—Brain entropy and human intelligence: A resting-state fMRI study

Christian Jarrett (@Psych_Writer) is Editor of BPS Research Digest

https://digest.bps.org.uk/2018/04/10/ca ... ood-thing/

Coffee and cancer

by Blue Frost » March 29th, 2018, 10:39 pm

I think people should sue to be rid of fluoride in our water supply, it's poison, and it's in most foods.

Coffee and cancer

by Blue Frost » March 29th, 2018, 10:36 pm

If people would look up how food is made, and processed a lot have cancer causing agents in them.
Your food is sometimes bleached, sometimes gassed with some strange stuff, some food we don't even know since it's from other places without regulations like ours.
Some food isn't even food like some of the plastic rice people was eating.

Coffee and cancer

by Reverse Flash » March 29th, 2018, 10:32 pm

Image

I need to cut down on my coffee in take. Maybe just 1 cup a week. Bad for my bones too. Dehydrates the body.

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/a ... -warnings/

Coffee

by Blue Frost » December 17th, 2017, 9:47 pm

I wonder what happens when you start drinking it, I don't drink coffee.
Love the smell of fresh ground though :)

Coffee

by Gary Oak » December 17th, 2017, 6:47 pm

One thing that happens when I stop drinking coffee is tons of pain and especially a continual headache :facepalm: SOme of these are not good. Coffee damages teeth and stains them.The lack of daily adrenaline and dopamine can lead to frequent headaches. Depending on how your body responds, you could either lose or gain weight. You could sleep better and this may expain my sleeping difficulties.

You could feel sick (but not for long) Headaches aren’t the only painful symptom of caffeine withdrawal. Those who stop consuming coffee have reported side effects like depression, anxiety, dizziness, flu-like symptoms, insomnia, irritability, mood swings, and sluggishness. Here’s the good news: you won’t feel this way forever. Experts say that most of the physical symptoms of caffeine withdrawal will pass after the first two days, while the rest of the side effects won’t last beyond a week or two.

You could have a healthier smile Coffee is highly acidic, which means it erodes your tooth enamel and stains your teeth with every sip. Cut the caffeine and you’ll protect your teeth from a lifetime of erosion, leading to a whiter (and more confident!) smile. Here are some other habits you didn't realize were harming your teeth .

Here's some good news, i am getting antioxidants :thumbsup: You could miss out on antioxidants , Coffee is the number-one source of antioxidants in the average American’s diet, according to research from the University of Scranton. Numerous studies have found that drinking more than three cups of coffee per day could decrease your risk of everything from breast cancer to Parkinson’s, as well as increase bone health. Unfortunately, it goes without saying that if you’re cutting back on coffee, you’ll be losing the health benefits, too. Thankfully, it’s not hard to make up for your regular coffee intake by replacing it with antioxidant-rich tea, fruits, and veggies. Check out our guide to the best antioxidant-rich produce .

You could have difficulty concentrating . This one is interesting :scratch: Fatigue and irritability are two side effects of a no-coffee diet that also contribute to lack of concentration, according to nutrition blogger Justin Caba. Caba told MedicalDaily that as he experienced caffeine withdrawal after cutting back on coffee, his productivity at work severely decreased. Blame it on the lack of stimulants you get from a dose of coffee, as well as the increase in adenosine, that pesky hormone that makes you feel tired. To counteract the loss of concentration, try chewing minty gum to keep your brain alert and on task. When participants did so in a study published in the British Journal of Psychology , they had quicker reaction times and more accurate results on their tasks, especially toward the end of the session. Plus, after just a week without caffeine, you’ll find that your productivity has increased because you no longer experience the inevitable afternoon crash after a morning cup of coffee. Here are some other myths and facts about how coffee affects your body .

You could become constipated

You could feel calmer If too much caffeine has ever left you squirming in your chair or jiggling your leg, it’s time to say goodbye to your double espresso shots. Since caffeine is a stimulant, it naturally raises levels of adrenaline and stress hormones in your body. Ditching caffeine will make you feel less stressed and anxious .

10 things that happen to your body when you stop drinking coffee

http://www.businessinsider.com/10-thing ... ee-2017-12

Re: Coffee

by Blue Frost » October 1st, 2016, 9:57 pm

i don't get much caffeine, never liked coffee, but the smell is nice in the morning.

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