Canadian Wildlife

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Gary Oak
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Post: # 63883Unread post Gary Oak »

I believe that Gary Oaks forum needs a Canadian Wildlife thread as I always have been a bit of a nature freak



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Gary Oak
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Post: # 63884Unread post Gary Oak »

[video][/video]

Marmy the Marmot is back and he/she has a large fan club. I don't believe that he is a Vancouver Island Marmot though...he just lives there.

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Post: # 63885Unread post Blue Frost »

:teehe:
[video][/video]

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Post: # 63888Unread post Blue Frost »

We have many of these here, I see them flying over almost daily.
Some even sleep in the field behind out house I have seen.

[video][/video]

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Re: Canadian Wildlife

Post: # 63891Unread post Reverse Flash »

We have Canadian geese everywhere here.
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Re: Canadian Wildlife

Post: # 63910Unread post Blue Frost »

I saw one once, it was blocking a drainage ditch from of the utility company :) it was so cool, every tree along the ditch was cut down like a machine did it .
They was all pointed stumps with chips all over around them.

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Re: Canadian Wildlife

Post: # 109102Unread post Gary Oak »

Well this isn't exactly Canadian wildlife but this is a species that Canada shares with the USA and I am happy to see that the gray wolf is making a comeback in the USA. I did see a very black one in Saskatchewan by the side of the highway a few years ago and saw a brown one about a month ago

http://www.businessinsider.com/r-photos ... ury-2015-8

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Re: Canadian Wildlife

Post: # 109105Unread post Blue Frost »

Likely they came down from fires in the mountains, or they are looking for water since everything is drying up.
Nice catch catching them on film.

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Re: Canadian Wildlife

Post: # 130712Unread post Gary Oak »

I was in a vehicle about five years ago on a highway past Lloydminster Alberta on the Saskatchewan side and we came accross a fairly large herd of wild horses. It was something to see. Also there is a wild horse herd on a reservation near Penticton but they are not afraid of people coming quite close to take photos.

Wild horses spotted near Wood Buffalo National Park

March 22, 2016

When it comes to wildlife, Wood Buffalo National Park is best known for, well, wood buffalo, but two small groups of wild horses have recently been spotted roaming near the park.

Stuart Macmillan, Wood Buffalo's manager of Resource Conservation, said two groups of about five horses have been spotted just outside of the park, which straddles the N.W.T./Alberta border. He said they look to be in good health, as seen in photographs taken during bison surveys.

"There's white ones, some darker ones, and look to be some palominos in there," he said.

"They look to be fine and healthy and doing well."

Macmillan said it's not the first time wandering horses have sought refuge in the remote areas in and around Canada's largest national park. Staff have occasionally seen wild horses on their surveys, both inside and outside of the park, alone and in groups.

Horses were spotted in the early 2000s during a general ungulate survey, and again 10 years later during summer anthrax surveillance flights. He said there were also reports of horses in the vicinity of the park on the north side, in the Slave River lowlands near Fort Smith, in the 1980s and 1990s.

"They seem to have been around for a while, [though] they may be different horses at different times, from different sources," Macmillan said.

"I think what's happening is that from time to time horses get away from where they're kept and then they roam around and find their way in and out of the park, but not in large numbers."

He said they're not concerned about any ecological impact on the park from the small groups and that it's unlikely they'll grow into a larger herd.

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Re: Canadian Wildlife

Post: # 130717Unread post Blue Frost »

i always wanted to travel where there was wild horses, would love to save some, and have a place for them.
They have round up, and sell them off for dog food :(

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Post: # 156414Unread post Gary Oak »

I heard of a fresh water coral reef nearby and was astounded. We will be checking this out very soon. This lake looks like a beautiful spot for a camping and fishing trip. I wonder if any new creatures will be found who live in this fresh water reef ? This has just been discovered just a few years ago. This reef certainly looks amazing.

Pavilion Lake is a must-do dive in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. Not only is the lake remarkably clear, but its one of the very, very few places where microbialites can be found! They look mike freshwater coral of some sort, but re actually a very different organism all together!

[video][/video]

[video][/video]

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Post: # 156534Unread post Gary Oak »

Pavilion Lake is actually not that big but it certainly has a beautiful blue color. Apparently the nearby Kelly lake also has these coral like structures too.

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Post: # 156539Unread post Blue Frost »

Pretty cool, I didn't know there was a such thing as a fresh water coral .

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Post: # 165129Unread post Gary Oak »

I have only seen a lynx once. This was in the Yukon decades ago at the side of the road . It had it's back arched and then it sort of bounced away as we passed. They sound like normal cats.

Rare encounter between 2 wild, shrieking lynx caught on video

Ed Trist lives off-grid in the Ontario bush, about 17 kilometres from the closest town, but a video he posted on Facebook has thrust him into a global spotlight.

Trist had been planning to catch a few minnows for fishing but instead caught a rare sighting of two lynx squaring off and wailing at one another.

"It was really bizarre," he said, adding that it's not unusual to see a lynx around the area, but the typically reclusive cat will usually be gone in a flash.

"You just get a quick glimpse of them and they're outta there. Two of them, together, headbutting each other and squaring off? It's extremely rare."

Trist, his girlfriend Nicole Lewis and his daughter were in an off-road vehicle, heading down a logging road in Avery Lake, 150 kilometres directly east of Kenora, when they came across the cats.

They stopped about nine metres from the lynx and watched for about 10 minutes, "and they didn't even care that we were there," Trist said.

When the trio decided to keep going, they drove right past the cats, who remained focused on one another.

Trist and Lewis both recorded the encounter and later posted the videos on their respective Facebook pages. Combined, the videos had eight million views between them in two days and nearly 190,000 shares.

Trist said he has been contacted by people "all over the world" who want to buy the video or interview him.

"It's absolutely overwhelming, to be honest," he said.

He hasn't been back down the logging road since Friday, but was planning a return on Monday.

While he'll keep his eyes peeled for the lynx, Trist said he always needs to be on guard for animal encounters because there are a lot of bears.

"You often see something. There's so much wildlife," he said. "But it's all luck running into that [lynx encounter]. Somebody said maybe I should buy a lottery ticket."

Chris Enright, head of veterinary services at Assiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg, agreed it is an extremely uncommon sight.

"Lynx are fairly common and I don't doubt they have this sort of interactions with one another, hidden in the boreal forest throughout Canada. But typically it's not witnessed, so it's really neat for that person to see," he said.

"We see cats and how they interact in a zoo setting, and it's always neat to see the same behaviour purely in the wild, but unfortunately we don't always get to see it. It's certainly a unique opportunity for us."

Without being able to tell the gender of the cats, Enright could only offer conjecture on what the encounter was about.

"If it was a little earlier in the season, I might suspect it was breeding season, and that was a male and female interacting, but it's a little bit tough to say from a minute on video," he said.

"This is a little late in the [breeding] season, but animals don't always read the textbook of when they're supposed to do things, so it certainly wouldn't have been impossible for one of those two lynx to have been a female that was torn between wanting to interact not wanting to, if you will."

There is also the possibility it was two males competing for a female, or it could have been two cats who simply crossed paths and are letting each other know about their territories, he added.

"Lynx are normally quite a solitary cat, but their home ranges may overlap," Enright said.

"A lot of animal interactions avoid direct conflict so there's vocalizations, there's body posturing, there's ways to kind of size each other up without directly having to get into a fight."

Whatever the reason, "it's really neat to get this window onto normal lynx behaviour in a really neat but reclusive species."

https://ca.yahoo.com/news/rare-encounte ... 29872.html

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Post: # 165131Unread post Blue Frost »

:laugh: They sound quite funny actually, not like what I have heard from our Bobcats which is the same animal.

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Post: # 165147Unread post Gary Oaktree »

Bobcats have much shorter fur and lynx’s paws are far bigger, they are as big as a cougars paws.

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Post: # 165148Unread post Blue Frost »

They are big here also in the mountains, and the same species, but there is smaller species called bobcat also, in the cat family.

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Post: # 165206Unread post Reverse Flash »

I have only seen a lynx at the Vancouver zoo. Saw s coyote once when walking my dog. At first I thought it was a skinny dog but it looked really weird. The coyote was no bigger than a medium size dog.

I have never encountered any black bear or cougar.

Last summer our sky was covered with smoke. It was the most terrible summer. There was air quality warning. I hope all that major wildfire doesn't happen again.
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Post: # 165209Unread post Blue Frost »

Coyote is no threat usually unless they are in a good sized pack, small kids, and small animals it can be a danger to them.
Ours here is a little smaller than a large dog, some are mixed with dogs so they can be more dangerous.

No Bears around here, or cougar, but they have been seem to the east since nobody hunts anymore, and Elk has been reintroduced.

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Post: # 165214Unread post Reverse Flash »

A few weeks ago over here a coyote was dragging a toddler away. Luckily the mother made the save in time. It was chewing on the toddler's head.
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