Nest Of Spies

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Nest Of Spies

Post: # 80201Unread post Gary Oak »

I read a fascinating book a few years ago.. Nest Of Spies by a couple of former CSIS agents and it really clued me in on a number if espionage issues that Canada is having to contend with. I wouldn't more spies like these ones though :cool:



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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 80203Unread post Blue Frost »

I remember that, and the funny thing is the ones accusing do the same thing. America, the US, and any country with a spy agency does it, and always has.
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 107677Unread post Gary Oak »

Canada loses about a billion $$$ a month to chinese spying. CSIS has found that China doesn't expect to pay Chinese Canadiscams to spy against Canada for China and they don't. These traitors do it for free and probably with glee. Over half of CSIS's espionage cases are Chinese.

http://chinawatchcanada.blogspot.ca/201 ... anada.html
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 110211Unread post Gary Oak »

This Russian spymaster has some very interesting ideas on how things will soon be unfolding.

http://sputniknews.com/politics/2015090 ... ecast.html
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 112696Unread post Gary Oak »

Chinese working for Nortel also would have been passing secrets along.

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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 112698Unread post Blue Frost »

Obama is good with them now, it's all worked out :kez: he bowed, and kissed ass when their president visited.

http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Columns/2 ... yber-Theft
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 113518Unread post Gary Oak »

if a Chinese person is working for a institution , company , organisation etc... and may have information that a Chinese business, organisation, State Security Bureau etc...may want then it is very likely that they will be approached for this information.

Was there a Chinese spy at NASA? Fleeing researcher 'carrying hard drive and laptops' arrested on China-bound plane at Virginia airport



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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 113519Unread post Blue Frost »

:wacko:
Who is to blame, China, and the Chinese for letting their national work at Nasa ?
Sounds like Obama's Fault, and his administration.
i think it's intentional, and treason by Obama, it's just that someone that's an American caught the guy.
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 114452Unread post Gary Oak »

Does anybody actually believe that a Canadian Chinese politician wouldn't not be approached to give information to Chinese intel ?

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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 114453Unread post Blue Frost »

I think the Chinese just has to wave money, and most politicians would sell out, here Bob Dole , a former vice president lobbies for them. Just sick.
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 115022Unread post Gary Oak »

I believe that all Chinese near secrets should always be under surveillance

http://www.businessinsider.com/2-nasa-c ... se-2015-10

2 NASA supervisors indicted under espionage laws for giving a Chinese national unrestricted research access

Two NASA supervisors were criminally indicted Tuesday under U.S. espionage laws for “willfully violating” national security regulations while allowing a visiting Chinese foreign national to gain “complete and unrestricted access” to the space agency’s Langley Research Center, according to the U.S. Attorneys office for the Eastern District of Virginia.

The indictments of NASA Langley supervisors Glenn A. Woodell and Daniel J. Jobson cap a federal investigation into their decision to permit Bo Jiang unrestricted access for two years at Langley. Bo Jiang was deported back to China in 2013.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Lisa McKeel filed the indictments against the two NASA supervisors before the U.S. District Court in Newport News, Virginia on October 20. The Daily Caller News Foundation obtained the indictments. Woodell and Jobson’s case will come before a yet-to-be named U.S. District Judge in the next few weeks, according to the U.S. Attorneys office.

McKeel charged Woodell and Jobson under Title 18 section 799 of the federal espionage statute, alleging their “failing to protect NASA information from unauthorized disclosure” and “continuing to allow a foreign national to exercise complete and unrestricted access to a NASA computer and the information contained.”

Woodell and Jobson also permitted Bo to travel home to China with a NASA-issued laptop that contained sensitive government information.

FBI agents arrested Bo at Dulles International Airport who tried to flee the country by buying a one-way ticket to Beijing in 2013. The Bo Jiang case was considered at the time as a prime example of lax national security awareness throughout the space agency.

The permissive attitude about IT security was blamed in part for last summer’s loss of personal information for 22 million federal government workers and their families through a breach at the U.S. Office of Personnel Management.

Langley research centerNASA
NASA's Langley Research Center.

It also a concern as a result of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton decision to use a personal email account and private server located at her New York home to conduct official government business.

Hundreds of emails found on the Clinton server contained sensitive or classified information that may have been compromised by hackers working for foreign intelligence services.

“This indictment is interesting because the NASA Administrator and the administration fought us all the way,” recalled former Representative Frank Wolf, the Virginia Republican who first made the Bo Jiang case public.

Wolf was chairman of a House subcommittee that had appropriations oversight of NASA. He retired in 2014 after 30 years in office.

“I want to commend the FBI,” he told TheDCNF. “And I want to commend the U.S. Attorneys office because I know when you get these cases there is a lot of push back. We now see what the Chinese are doing with the cyberattacks.”

Wolf was one of 17 House congressmen whose office computers were hacked by the Chinese in 2008. All 17 were members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Despite the record of Chinese attacks, Wolf said it was impossible to get the Obama administration or NASA to seriously investigate the Bo Jiang case.
“When the high level whistleblower came to us, we really couldn’t get anybody within the administration or NASA to take this seriously nor could we get the IG,” Wolf said. “We were told, ‘Bo Jiang, no problem, don’t worry about it. This is alarmist. There’s nothing there.’ Only after we got law enforcement involved could we get action.”

A knowledgeable NASA official who requested anonymity said “the whole Bo Jiang incident was brought to management’s attention. They ignored it. They asked us to ignore it.” The official said foreigners have more, not less, access to NASA operations at present.

Before the Bo Jiang case all foreign nationals, including green card holders, could be monitored and restricted. But now green card holders are treated like U.S. citizens with unrestricted access to all parts of the space research facility

“If you have a green card, your allegiance may still be to China, but the green card gets you legal authority to work in the United States,” he said. “Therefore we don’t track them. They don’t have restrictions to transfer technology control plans. They’re given access the same exact way as a U.S. citizen because they have a green card.”

The official also charged that Woodell asked NASA authorities if he could return to the space center as an outside consultant after a guilty plea. The official did not know what Woodell was told.

Whistleblowers who went out on a limb to disclose the Bo Jiang case continue to face difficulties. One of them recently left the agency and accepted a reduction in pay, going from a GS-15 to a lower paying GS-13 ranking.

Read the original article on Daily Caller News Foundation. Copyright 2015. Follow Daily Caller News Foundation on Twitter.
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 124962Unread post Gary Oak »

Fadden lost his job for doing his job responsibly ,telling the truth and being a patriot.

CSIS: China Controls Canadian Politicians

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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 127843Unread post Gary Oak »

I have very good reason that there are currently Chinese "teams" in Vancouver and probably other places in Canada, the USA and other nations too.

The Chinese Secret Police In The United StatesBy Sherman H. Skolnick <skolnick@ameritech.net>

This is a story about the Chinese Secret Police in the UNITED STATES. When the Korean War ended, 1953, the U.S. made a peace accord with North Korea. There were no surrender terms, however, apparently with mainland China which had intervened in that war. The Chinese Secret Police had a score to settle with the U.S. The Bejing Government was disgruntled in that the U.S. Military, under Gen. Douglas MacArthur had caused Red China to intervene in the war by the U.S. troops going into North Korea up to the Yalu River, the North Korea/Red China boundary line. Result: waves of Red Chinese troops attacked the U.S. troops with huge casualties on both sides. Here is what happened, with a background. The Chinese Secret Police have a long history, going back to 550 B.C. By the 20th Century they were called Te-Wu, and they use a clandestine dialect almost impossible even for professionals to get into and understand. With only one exception, there have been no defectors to the West----so the CIA and FBI have been stymied on how to deal with them. U.S. espionage experts left over from World War 2---then called OSS, and supposedly out of service---quietly were used by the then-young CIA to track Te-Wu here. By 1956, the Chinese Secret Service made a massive effort to infiltrate the U.S. What were the Chinese doing here? They were suspected of strange bombings and murders---an on-going campaign to punish the U.S. for causing China to intervene in the Korean War. With the coming of Chairman Mao, a wave of young, clever Chinese ran away to the U.S. from families that became wealthy in the dope traffic in major cities like Shanghai. Even after coming to America, they retained their financial ownership interest in the Hong Kong & SHANGHAI Bank with offices in the U.S. such as in Chicago. In America, they studied at elite universities and became scientists, super-duper lab technicians, and university professors. They infiltrated U.S. technology---about 350 or more with the Te-Wu. Most are still around. These families, by the way, had already removed their illicit funds to U.S. Banks. Since the Red Chinese seemed to pose no further military threat to the U.S., the American CIA simply did nothing but try to track them. Also, the Chinese were age-old enemies of Viet Nam, a power play item in that war. The CIA and FBI refused to take action. Later in the 1980s, the dope trade was changing. Columbian cocaine had flooded into the southern states thanks to George Herbert Walker Bush with close ties to China and thanks to Ollie North and the airport at Mena, Arkansas. Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton was made a partner in the dope CIA dope traffic. By 1986, the First National Bank of Chicago, a Rockefeller entity, had loaned billions of dollars to mainland China on the false promise they would pay back in gold from their western provinces. To help China pay, the CIA and that Bankarranged for massive amounts of "China White", high purity heroin, to be smuggled into the U.S. through small airports in the suburbs of Chicago as a major intake point for the whole U.S. Supervising this reportedly was Jim Thompson, a Bush and Rockefeller crony, who was Illinois Governor, for 14 years up to 1990. The "China White" deluge has been handled by a secretive unit of the law firm of which he has since then been Chairman, Winston & Strawn, Chicago-headquartered. (I produced and caused to be cablecast on the public access channel in Chicago, in November, 1994, a one-hour Cable TV Show about "China White" and Jim Thompson). The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration when confronted by me and a Cable TV Program associate refused to consider our details, although we put it directly to a top official of DEA in Chicago. The Red Chinese have one of the largest diplomatic delegations in the U.S., many of them suspected of being Te-Wu. The Beijing head of Te-Wu, reportedly Wang Jun, is a PRIVATE law client of Kenneth W. Starr, the so-called Independent Counsel probing Clinton. Wang Jun, from time to time, meets with Clinton in the White House. AND, Clinton reportedly turned over to Wang Jun, U.S. financial, industrial,and MILITARY SECRETS, which is treason against the U.S. Constitution and the American people. Starr is also an UNREGISTERED foreign lobbyist for the Red Chinese government, an offense that Clinton could use to put Starr in prison with. The North American head of the Red Chinese Secret Police lives in the Midwest and has a direct communications link to the White House. By the way, members of Te-Wu, together with those of the infamous Woo family, in recent years owned and operated the Chicagp Sun-Times, one of the two major Chicago papers. (For some background, see the book "The Soong Dynasty" by Sterling Seagrave, Harper & Row, N.Y., 1985.)
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Re: Nest Of Spies

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The Unpleasant Truth About Chinese Espionage

Thanks to weak American counterintelligence and limited public awareness, the risk to Beijing is low while the rewards can be high

By John R. Schindler • 04/22/16 9:45am



Two ladies take a tricycle in the streets of Beijing on April 20, 2016.
Women on the streets of Beijing. (Photo: Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images)

Chinese espionage against the United States is in the news again. Recently in this column I explained the sensational case of Edward Lin, the Taiwanese immigrant turned U.S. Navy officer who stands accused of committing espionage against his adopted homeland. This story raises many troubling questions about the dismal state of security in our navy, which seems unable to keep secrets anymore.

Although the navy is staying tight-lipped about Lieutenant Commander Lin, it’s already evident that the damage he perpetrated—thanks to his high-level access to some of the navy’s best-guarded secrets—is daunting. Damning, too, is the newsthat Mr. Lin was arrested while boarding a flight bound for China, the beneficiary of his alleged betrayal. No wonder top admirals want to keep as much of his impending trial classified as possible, to prevent public discussion of how much damage this traitor wrought on our national security.

Yet this is no isolated incident. In the two weeks since the Lin story broke, we have still more cases of Chinese immigrants accused of spying against their adopted country on behalf of their ancestral one. Szuhsiung “Allen” Ho, a Chinese immigrant and naturalized American, faces a raft of charges for running an espionage ring aimed at stealing nuclear secrets for Beijing. According to the Federal indictment, at the direction of a Chinese state-owned nuclear power company Mr. Ho recruited a half-dozen engineers to get nuclear secrets that Beijing wanted but could not obtain legally from the United States.

The key recruit in Mr. Ho’s spy ring, none of whose members have been named by the Justice Department, was a senior executive with the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Knoxville-based Federal energy corporation. The TVA executive, a native of Taiwan who was naturalized in 1990, allegedly received $15,555 from Mr. Ho in exchange for nuclear secrets, which the ringleader presumably passed to Beijing.

This seems to have been a classic case of sexual entrapment, what counterspies term a honey-trap.

The other five engineers caught up in the spy net—two of whom are in Pennsylvania, with two more in South Carolina, while the last is in Colorado—include one naturalized Chinese immigrant. All received money from Mr. Ho in exchange for information on how to produce special nuclear material: plutonium, uranium-233 and enriched uranium. Public information does not reveal the extent of the damage to our national security caused by this espionage network, but the fact that it began back in 1997 hints that the amount of nuclear information it illegally passed to Beijing may be extensive.

Chinese espionage, both online and old-fashioned, represents a serious threat to American security and prosperity, as Washington, DC, has stated many times. Cyber theft and online pilfering of American intellectual property was castigated as “the greatest transfer of wealth in history” by the director of the National Security Agency back in 2012, and things have only gotten worse since then, with China taking the lead in stealing our secrets for profit and strategic advantage. Last year, the FBI reported a shocking rise of 53 percent in economic espionage, with the “vast majority” of those cases originating in China. Using immigrants to enable such theft is a serious problem, as evidenced by the recent case of a wealthy Chinese entrepreneur who moved to Canada, where he assisted hackers back in China with stealing Pentagon secrets, particularly relating to advanced aircraft designs.

Beijing’s interest in our secrets extends far beyond national security and advanced technology. Chinese espionage aims at many sectors of our economy, even agriculture. Our government recently warned farmers to be wary of Chinese businessmen showing interest in genetically engineered seed and other commercial secrets—they may be spies. In January, Mo Hailong, one of six Chinese nationals Federal authorities accused of digging up seeds from Iowa farms to send back to China, pleaded guilty in a case that the Justice Department treated as a national security matter—not a normal criminal prosecution. This agricultural espionage ring was acting at Beijing’s direction, according to authorities familiar with the case, constituting the norm these days as Chinese spies seek any commercially valuable secrets they can pilfer from unsuspecting Americans.

While Chinese espionage against the United States is hardly new, it has taken on fresh intensity. Since few Chinese spies get caught, thanks to weak American counterintelligence and limited public awareness of this threat, the risk to Beijing is low while the rewards can be high. Relying on quantity of spies rather than quality is not especially cost-effective by Western standards but makes sense here. The300,000 Chinese students at American universities include a fair share of spies and very few (if any) James Bonds. Many may not even be spying willingly, since offering up purloined baubles to the regime is often the price of studying overseas for Chinese students. Yet their task is to serve as low-level collectors of trade and other secrets that happen to cross their collegiate path, and that’s very difficult for American authorities to even notice, much less stop.

A Chinese-American fell under suspicion of espionage, yet the case was allowed to ‘fall off the table’ since higher-ups had no stomach for a nasty political fight amid cries of ‘racial profiling.’

The most challenging part of how China spies on the United States is that Beijing’smodus operandi relies overwhelmingly on co-nationals. Chinese intelligence agencies seldom stray far from working with ethnic kin and Beijing-related spy cases here that do not involve ethnic Chinese are very much an exception. Even when non-Chinese are involved, there is usually someone tied to Beijing by ethnicity somewhere in the operation.

For instance, in 2014 Benjamin Bishop, a 60-year-old former army lieutenant colonel and a defense contractor at U.S. Pacific Command in Hawaii, pleaded guilty to passing classified national defense information to an unauthorized person—his Chinese girlfriend. He met the 27-year-old woman, studying in America on a student visa, at a conference and the two began a romantic relationship. Soon Mr. Bishop was looking for classified materials she wanted and among the secrets he passed her was information about war plans, missile defense and nuclear weapons. This seems to have been a classic case of sexual entrapment, what counterspies term a honey-trap. Mr. Bishop received a seven-year sentence for his crimes.

This is an old pattern. A well-known case is that of Katrina Leung, a Chinese immigrant turned Republican activist who worked for the FBI for two decades as a spy against Beijing. Except Ms. Leung, whose FBI covername was “Parlor Maid,” was really a double agent whose true loyalty was always to her homeland. James Smith, her FBI handler and the head of the Bureau’s Chinese counterintelligence operations in Los Angeles, was also her lover for twenty years, illegally sharing classified information with Ms. Leung, which she surely passed to Beijing. The case, which broke in 2003, reflected poorly on the FBI, not least because Mr. Smith was not the only FBI agent Ms. Leung was sleeping with, coupled with the fact that the Bureau had repeated warnings that “Parlor Maid” was really working for China—all ignored.

The People’s Republic of China has long relied on ethnic ties to enable its espionage. In spying, they are deeply dependent on the more than fifty million people of Chinese extraction worldwide who are living outside China and Taiwan, whom Beijing terms Overseas Chinese. China is hardly alone here. Many of the biggest espionage threats to the United States exploit ethnicity to induce betrayal. Russia has done this for decades, co-opting émigrés to spy for Moscow. Even in Soviet times, there were always Russians abroad who loathed Communism yet might be convinced to spy for the Motherland. Iran, too, exploits émigrés as would-be spies, sometimes ruthlessly, while Israel has not been above calling on certain Jews in the diaspora to work for the Mossad on grounds of tribal solidarity.

It should be noted how differently Beijing handles such matters: Traitors are dealt with harshly in China.

That said, Beijing is unique in the degree that it is so heavily dependent on Overseas Chinese for espionage. This is hardly confined to the United States. Canada demonstrates an identical pattern, with Chinese immigrants serving as the main source for Beijing’s espionage against our northern neighbor. China represents the biggest counterintelligence threat to Canada, according to Ottawa security agencies, and that involves numerous immigrants and Canadians of Chinese background. Reflecting a common pattern in Canada, where politicians routinely ignore good security advice, as I’ve explained in this column before, in 2010 Canadian intelligence warned the government that Michael Chan, a Chinese immigrant turned Liberal Party politician, was close to Chinese intelligence. However, this did not harm Mr. Chan’s career, and today he remains a minister in the Ontario provincial government.

Indeed, Mr. Chan protested his innocence amid accusations of “racial profiling” by ethnic activists. The same happens in America, where any person of Chinese origin who falls under suspicion of nefarious activities for Beijing will get backing by activists eager to make the case go away amid cries of “racial profiling.”

Of course, not every accused person is guilty as charged, and sometimes the FBI goes overboard in its efforts to catch spies. However, allegations of ethnic bias have a chilling effect on our operations to curb Chinese spying on our country, particularly when members of Congress get on the bandwagon. I recall from my own days in the counterintelligence business more than one case of a Chinese-American who fell under suspicion of espionage for Beijing—based on solid evidence, not hearsay—yet the case was allowed to “fall off the table” since higher-ups had no stomach for a nasty political fight amid cries of “racial profiling.”

It should be noted how differently Beijing handles such matters. Traitors are dealt with harshly in China, where a computer technician has just been sentenced to death for passing secrets to unnamed foreign spies. This is part of a push to root out spies in China, where fears of espionage on behalf of foreign powers run high. A new campaign by the regime to raise awareness of this threat includes a cartoon titled“Dangerous Love” which features a Chinese woman falling prey to the charms of a red-headed Caucasian man who is in reality a foreign spy. There seems to be no fear of profiling, racial or otherwise, in Beijing.

It can be safely assumed that Chinese espionage against the United States will continue and that it will rely heavily on spies of Chinese origin. Today’s news brings word of yet another Chinese immigrant, here a woman in Florida, arrested for illegally exporting our defense technology to Beijing. It can also be safely assumed that Edward Lin and other Americans accused of spying for China will get fairer and more humane treatment from our government than they would if they were suspected by Beijing of spying for the United States. Racial profiling is going on here—in how the Chinese Communist regime exploits Overseas Chinese for espionage and the betrayal of our country. That is the fault of nobody in Washington, DC.
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 136355Unread post Gary Oak »

Look at what ao many Chinese do when they get to enjoy the benefits of living in a country that is far nicer to live in than their own. Look at the number of front companies that are being used by the Chinese for espionage. Is this just a bit too ungrateful ?

Rash of Chinese Spy Cases Shows a Silent National Emergency

This news analysis was originally dispatched as part of Epoch Times China email newsletters. Subscribe to the newsletters by filling your email in the “China D-brief” box under this article.
There have been four cases of Chinese espionage against the United States in just the last three weeks. These haven’t been the run-of-the-mill cyberspies either; these are Cold War-style cases of individuals allegedly caught spying on behalf of a communist regime.
Three of the cases involved people trying to steal nuclear technology. Another involved the theft of cutting-edge technology for unmanned submarines.
The first case garnered the most attention. On April 8, the U.S. military held the first hearing on the case of Lt. Cmdr. Edward Chieh-Liang Lin. The U.S. military officer and Taiwanese immigrant served as a “nuclear-trained enlisted sailor” and as a signals intelligence expert, and was allegedly spying on behalf of Taiwan and Mainland China.
Just five days later, a Chinese citizen, Fuyi “Frank” Sun, 52, was arrested in New York for trying to obtain sensitive carbon fiber used in nuclear centrifuges. Sun allegedly told undercover agents he worked for the Chinese regime’s missile program and had close ties to the Chinese military.
The next day, on April 14, another individual was indicted, alongside a Chinese state-owned nuclear power company, in a conspiracy case in Tennessee. Szuhsiung “Allen” Ho was allegedly acting on behalf of the state-run company to illegally transfer nuclear materials to China.
Then, just seven days later on April 21, Amin Yu, 53, was charged in Florida for “acting as an illegal agent” for China and trying to steal sensitive technology, including for unmanned underwater vehicles.
If the tables were turned, and four American spies were caught spying on another country—especially if it were in the course of a few weeks—it would be an international scandal. But with China, the world seems to have gotten somewhat desensitized to its brazen use of espionage.
In fact, only two of the cases were broadly covered by U.S. news outlets.
The unfortunate fact is that there are so many cases of Chinese espionage against the United States—both using cyberattacks and human spies—that they’ve begun to blend in with each other.
Chinese espionage has become the “dog bites man” story, where cases are so common that they’ve lost their shock value. People are no longer surprised by the cases, and so many news outlets seem to gloss over them.
But the importance of these cases is no less significant than it was during the Cold War, and the frequency of spy cases coming out of China isn’t a whole lot different.
The fact is that while China’s use of cyberattacks for espionage has taken center stage, it also has a very large system for conventional espionage—and its spies on both ends will often work together.
The Chinese military’s two main departments for this type of espionage are overseen by its General Staff Department. The cyberattacks are run under its Third Department, which handles signals intelligence (SIGINT); while its human intelligence (HUMINT) operations are carried out by its Second Department.
Epoch Times reported previously that the Chinese regime has between 250,000 and 300,000 soldiers under its Third Department dedicated to cyberespionage. Its Second Department has between 30,000 and 50,000 human spies working on insider operations.
The Chinese military also runs more than 3,200 military front companies in the United States, which are dedicated to theft. The information was revealed by the FBI’s former deputy director for counterintelligence, in a 2010 report from the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency.
Read More
Murder, Money, and Spies Investigative Series
With these numbers in mind, it’s important to point out that even though cases of Chinese espionage (both SIGINT and HUMINT) are regularly exposed, the cases brought to light are just a drop in the ocean compared to the broader picture of what’s taking place.
There is also a lot of overlap between China’s use of cyberattacks and human spies. Sources told Epoch Times in a previous interview that Chinese cyberspies will even at times launch cyberattacks to cover the tracks of spies working as insiders in U.S. businesses and government agencies.
The rationale of using human intelligence operatives was explained well in a previous interview with Jarrett Kolthoff, president of cyber counterintelligence company SpearTip and a former special agent in U.S. Army counterintelligence.
Kolthoff told Epoch Times that Chinese spies are interested in “quantity first, quality second,” and often grab everything they can. He said they look for whatever approach is most effective for reaching this goal, and they “determine that it’s much easier to obtain the information through a rogue insider, or a trusted insider who is working for someone else.”
He said that while the human spy is at work, cyberspies will then launch attacks as a ruse, and this makes it appear the information was stolen through a cyberattack instead of an insider. This prevents the company or agency from searching for the insider spy, and Kolthoff noted “it’s very, very effective.”

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Re: Nest Of Spies

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I have heard from a university teacher in Korea that 70 % of the Chinese students are keeping an eye out for information for the motherland. I find this easy to believe after my long experience over there. All tong members have sworn FAN QING FU MING which I believe is obvious that they are sworn enemies of Canada and Canadians as well as all non Chinese all over the world. They really are not amused about my posting the truth about FAN QING FU MING on the internet.

TORONTO—A Globe and Mail report that confirms years of coverage by the Epoch Times recounts the story behind Ontario Immigration Minister Michael Chan, who has close ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

In a bombshell story that includes several incidents previously covered by Epoch Times, Globe reporter Craig Offman wrote about Chan’s role as a conduit between Canada and China, and that Chan was the subject of a warning by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service(CSIS) to the Ontario provincial government in August 2010.

Chan has been a vocal supporter of the regime.

Offman uncovered that Chan was one of two provincial ministers former CSIS Director Richard Fadden was referring to in comments made in 2010.Fadden warned that there were provincial ministers under the influence of a foreign regime.

“You invite somebody back to the homeland. You pay [for] their trips and all of a sudden you discover that when an event is occurring that is of particular interest to country X, you call up and you ask the person to take a particular view,” Fadden told CBC.

At the time of his remarks, Fadden was fiercely denounced, sometimes by groups that intelligence experts see as front organizations for the Chinese regime.

Fadden faced a political firestorm that saw him hauled before a Parliamentary committee and forced to backpedal. At the time of Fadden’s comments, the federal Liberals had asked for Fadden’s resignation. But shortly after those events, CSIS approached the Ontario government to alert the province to its concerns about Chan, reported Offman.

Chan’s Heart ‘With the Motherland’



Chan is a polarizing figure in the Chinese community, Offman noted, due to his closeness to Beijing—a position that raises concerns among those disturbed by the Chinese Communist Party’s efforts to influence Chinese-Canadians.

Chan has been a vocal supporter of the regime, making comments first reported by the Epoch Times and later confirmed and expanded in Offman’s report.

At a celebration in China of the 60th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party in 2009, state-run Chinese media outlet Xinhua reported Chan as saying, “The motherland is great … the motherland is strong … our overseas Chinese hearts are with the motherland. We are proud of the motherland for its development.”

Offman added more of that speech, noting Chan also said, “Today, seeing the army on parade with such precision and the high spirits of the people, I am moved even more by the strength and power of my motherland.”

Chan never denied the quote to the Epoch Times, but did deny it to Offman, who interviewed the Xinhua journalist who reported the comment. That reporter stood by the quote.

Chan’s close ties to the regime worry some Canadians, particularly democracy activists, reported Offman.

The Epoch Times has spoken with other critics of the regime worried about Chan’s ties. At the heart of the issue is the Chinese regime’s extensive efforts to silence Canadian citizens who criticize it or reveal its human rights abuses. Such efforts include routinely threatening Canadians’ family members in China. Miss World Canada Anastasia Lin discovered that firsthand recently when her father, who lives in China was threatened for her human rights advocacy.

Regime’s Influence in Canada

Meanwhile the regime also makes extensive efforts to influence the Canadian government through allies who can advance its interests and broader efforts to extend its soft power.

One of those efforts is the spread of Confucius Institutes—Chinese languages and culture schools Beijing uses to extend its soft power. According to now-disgraced former Toronto District School Board Chair Chris Bolton, Chan was an important ally in the now abandoned efforts to get the institutes into Toronto schools.

Chan has been an important Chinese face for the Ontario Liberals.

Confucius Institutes discriminate against groups targeted by the regime and actively recruit students to propagate the regime’s views on Tibet. Fadden also raised concerns about the institutes.

Besides supporting the institutes, Chan also hired Wilson Chan and Michael Huang, two men the Epoch Times has previously reported on.

Wilson Chan is the former editor of Sing Tao, a Chinese daily newspaper whose Canadian operations are partly owned by the Toronto Star. Chan was fired after Epoch Times revealed Sing Tao reworked a translated Toronto Star story to reflect the Chinese Communist Party’s views on Tibet and protests against the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.

Wilson Chan was then hired to be Michael Chan’s communications adviser before moving on to Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne’s office as press secretary of ethnic media. Epoch Times has routinely covered the Chinese regime’s influence over Chinese media outlets and how these outlets propagate the regime’s views within Canada.

Read More
•Newly Crowned Miss World Canada Says Father Threatened in China

Michael Huang, as previously reported by Epoch Times, was a policy advisor in former Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Michael Colle’s office shortly after acting as a board member for the Chinese Professionals Association of Canada (CPAC), another organization with close ties to Beijing.

Colle gave CPAC $250,000 in grants that the group had not formally applied for. CPAC is a member of the National Congress of Chinese Canadians (NCCC), a group known to advance the Chinese Communist Party’s interest in Canada.

Defector Chen Yonglin, formerly the first secretary at the Chinese Consulate in Sydney, Australia, confirmed after defecting in 2005 that the NCCC and its equivalents in other countries are at the top of a pyramid of groups set up by the Chinese Embassy and consulates in Canada charged with working to control and influence the Chinese community and the Canadian government.

Offman noted the Epoch Times coverage of Huang’s advocacy on interests of the Chinese regime. Huang is working in Michael Chan’s constituency office.

Not a Cozy Fit

More recently, Chan has been mentoring Chinese candidates for the federal Liberal Party. Those efforts have spurred rumblings from Chinese democracy advocates in Canada.

Meanwhile, Offman noted, China remains under authoritarian rule “that terrorizes and tortures political foes, religious groups and ethnic minorities. Its spying on trade partners grows ever more blatant. None of this is a cozy fit with Canadian values of due process, democracy and accommodation.”

The Globe article noted Chan’s prowess as a fundraiser for his party, regularly drawing high-profile federal Liberals like former Prime Minister Jean Chretien, a reputation Chan developed prior to entering politics.

Chan has been an important Chinese face for the Ontario Liberals. He swept his first election in Markham, a community now 50 percent Chinese, and was immediately made revenue minister and then citizenship and immigration minister. Chan continues to be a star fundraiser, Offman reported.

When asked about China’s human rights record, Chan told Offman the country now lets its people travel abroad, describing that as a once-unfathomable freedom.

Chan fiercely denies any wrongdoing on his part and federal Liberal MP John McCallum has compared the investigation of Chan to McCarthyism. Chan told Offman that he had nothing to hide from CSIS or anyone else. He is defended by his party leader and Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne.

Following the Globe’s articles on Chan, he wrote an open letter denouncing the stories as a “re-hash of ludicrous allegations.”

This article was edited to remove comments attributed to Justice Minister Peter MacKay by the Canadian Press that suggested MacKay said there was an ongoing investigation of Chan. MacKay later refuted the substance of how those comments were reported.

http://chinawatchcanada.blogspot.ca/201 ... print.html
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Gary Oak
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 137263Unread post Gary Oak »

I believe that it is a very safe bet that Ontario Immigration Minister Michael Chan is a tong member who has sworn FAN QING FU MING along with the other oaths and rituals of his tong. Now this means that this Ontario immigration minister is a sworn enemy of non Chinese Canadians and Canada. This might be considered wonderful by our new prime minister Justin Trudeau and a great victory for the Chinese however I do not believe that he is appropriate for this position he holds with all the benefits that Chinese would never allow non chinese if they succeeded taking over Canada.

Michael Chan and the Troubling Thumbprint of the Chinese Communist Party in Canada
By Matthew Little, Epoch Times

TORONTO—A Globe and Mail report that confirms years of coverage by the Epoch Times recounts the story behind Ontario Immigration Minister Michael Chan, who has close ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

In a bombshell story that includes several incidents previously covered by Epoch Times, Globe reporter Craig Offman wrote about Chan’s role as a conduit between Canada and China, and that Chan was the subject of a warning by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service(CSIS) to the Ontario provincial government in August 2010.

Chan has been a vocal supporter of the regime.

Offman uncovered that Chan was one of two provincial ministers former CSIS Director Richard Fadden was referring to in comments made in 2010.Fadden warned that there were provincial ministers under the influence of a foreign regime.

“You invite somebody back to the homeland. You pay [for] their trips and all of a sudden you discover that when an event is occurring that is of particular interest to country X, you call up and you ask the person to take a particular view,” Fadden told CBC.

At the time of his remarks, Fadden was fiercely denounced, sometimes by groups that intelligence experts see as front organizations for the Chinese regime.

Fadden faced a political firestorm that saw him hauled before a Parliamentary committee and forced to backpedal. At the time of Fadden’s comments, the federal Liberals had asked for Fadden’s resignation. But shortly after those events, CSIS approached the Ontario government to alert the province to its concerns about Chan, reported Offman.

Chan’s Heart ‘With the Motherland’

Chan is a polarizing figure in the Chinese community, Offman noted, due to his closeness to Beijing—a position that raises concerns among those disturbed by the Chinese Communist Party’s efforts to influence Chinese-Canadians.

Chan has been a vocal supporter of the regime, making comments first reported by the Epoch Times and later confirmed and expanded in Offman’s report.

At a celebration in China of the 60th anniversary of the Chinese Communist Party in 2009, state-run Chinese media outlet Xinhua reported Chan as saying, “The motherland is great … the motherland is strong … our overseas Chinese hearts are with the motherland. We are proud of the motherland for its development.”

Offman added more of that speech, noting Chan also said, “Today, seeing the army on parade with such precision and the high spirits of the people, I am moved even more by the strength and power of my motherland.”

Chan never denied the quote to the Epoch Times, but did deny it to Offman, who interviewed the Xinhua journalist who reported the comment. That reporter stood by the quote.

Chan’s close ties to the regime worry some Canadians, particularly democracy activists, reported Offman.

The Epoch Times has spoken with other critics of the regime worried about Chan’s ties. At the heart of the issue is the Chinese regime’s extensive efforts to silence Canadian citizens who criticize it or reveal its human rights abuses. Such efforts include routinely threatening Canadians’ family members in China. Miss World Canada Anastasia Lin discovered that firsthand recently when her father, who lives in China was threatened for her human rights advocacy.

Regime’s Influence in Canada

Meanwhile the regime also makes extensive efforts to influence the Canadian government through allies who can advance its interests and broader efforts to extend its soft power.

One of those efforts is the spread of Confucius Institutes—Chinese languages and culture schools Beijing uses to extend its soft power. According to now-disgraced former Toronto District School Board Chair Chris Bolton, Chan was an important ally in the now abandoned efforts to get the institutes into Toronto schools.

Chan has been an important Chinese face for the Ontario Liberals.

Confucius Institutes discriminate against groups targeted by the regime and actively recruit students to propagate the regime’s views on Tibet. Fadden also raised concerns about the institutes.

Besides supporting the institutes, Chan also hired Wilson Chan and Michael Huang, two men the Epoch Times has previously reported on.

Wilson Chan is the former editor of Sing Tao, a Chinese daily newspaper whose Canadian operations are partly owned by the Toronto Star. Chan was fired after Epoch Times revealed Sing Tao reworked a translated Toronto Star story to reflect the Chinese Communist Party’s views on Tibet and protests against the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.

Wilson Chan was then hired to be Michael Chan’s communications adviser before moving on to Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne’s office as press secretary of ethnic media. Epoch Times has routinely covered the Chinese regime’s influence over Chinese media outlets and how these outlets propagate the regime’s views within Canada.

Read More
•Newly Crowned Miss World Canada Says Father Threatened in China

Michael Huang, as previously reported by Epoch Times, was a policy advisor in former Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Michael Colle’s office shortly after acting as a board member for the Chinese Professionals Association of Canada (CPAC), another organization with close ties to Beijing.

Colle gave CPAC $250,000 in grants that the group had not formally applied for. CPAC is a member of the National Congress of Chinese Canadians (NCCC), a group known to advance the Chinese Communist Party’s interest in Canada.

Defector Chen Yonglin, formerly the first secretary at the Chinese Consulate in Sydney, Australia, confirmed after defecting in 2005 that the NCCC and its equivalents in other countries are at the top of a pyramid of groups set up by the Chinese Embassy and consulates in Canada charged with working to control and influence the Chinese community and the Canadian government.

Offman noted the Epoch Times coverage of Huang’s advocacy on interests of the Chinese regime. Huang is working in Michael Chan’s constituency office.

Not a Cozy Fit

More recently, Chan has been mentoring Chinese candidates for the federal Liberal Party. Those efforts have spurred rumblings from Chinese democracy advocates in Canada.

Meanwhile, Offman noted, China remains under authoritarian rule “that terrorizes and tortures political foes, religious groups and ethnic minorities. Its spying on trade partners grows ever more blatant. None of this is a cozy fit with Canadian values of due process, democracy and accommodation.”

The Globe article noted Chan’s prowess as a fundraiser for his party, regularly drawing high-profile federal Liberals like former Prime Minister Jean Chretien, a reputation Chan developed prior to entering politics.

Chan has been an important Chinese face for the Ontario Liberals. He swept his first election in Markham, a community now 50 percent Chinese, and was immediately made revenue minister and then citizenship and immigration minister. Chan continues to be a star fundraiser, Offman reported.

When asked about China’s human rights record, Chan told Offman the country now lets its people travel abroad, describing that as a once-unfathomable freedom.

Chan fiercely denies any wrongdoing on his part and federal Liberal MP John McCallum has compared the investigation of Chan to McCarthyism. Chan told Offman that he had nothing to hide from CSIS or anyone else. He is defended by his party leader and Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne.

Following the Globe’s articles on Chan, he wrote an open letter denouncing the stories as a “re-hash of ludicrous allegations.”

This article was edited to remove comments attributed to Justice Minister Peter MacKay by the Canadian Press that suggested MacKay said there was an ongoing investigation of Chan. MacKay later refuted the substance of how those comments were reported.

http://chinawatchcanada.blogspot.ca/201 ... print.html
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 139270Unread post Gary Oak »

I think that either his death was faked to help him fade into obscurity or the Russians got him. I personally believe that Canada needs millions of Russian spies that look like Anna Chapman :thumbsup: :flower:

Russian ‘traitor’ who exposed Anna Chapman's spy ring dead in US – reports

https://www.rt.com/news/349932-russia-spy-dead-us/
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 139271Unread post Blue Frost »

Russia don't need spies with people like Obama in the White house, and Hillary's emails.
Of course I talk to myself. Sometimes I need expert advise, and a good conversation.
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Gary Oak
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Re: Nest Of Spies

Post: # 139273Unread post Gary Oak »

Maybe they are already on Russia's payroll.

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