Wierd Weather

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Gary Oaktree

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Post: # 161349Unread post Gary Oaktree
Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:38 am

This eastern freeze is weird. I heard one eastern American city had a flood that was frozen.



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Blue Frost
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Post: # 161350Unread post Blue Frost
Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:27 pm

" Sahara Desert in Algeria covered in up to 15 inches of SNOW as the next little ice age begins
More than 15 inches has blanketed sand dunes across the small town of Ain Sefra, Algeria.
It is the second time snow has hit in nearly 40 years, with a dusting also recorded in December 2016.
But this snowfall which hit yesterday, is much deeper than the fleeting shower little more than a year ago.
Locals, who endure temperatures of 37C in summer, were stunned as dense snow settled on the town, known as ‘the gateway to the desert’."

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Post: # 161352Unread post Blue Frost
Tue Jan 09, 2018 12:31 pm

Gary Oaktree wrote:
Tue Jan 09, 2018 2:38 am
This eastern freeze is weird. I heard one eastern American city had a flood that was frozen.
The Atlantic off the coast of Massachusetts.
[video][/video]

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Post: # 162104Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:22 pm

THese hailstones are lethal. Nobody can afford to get hit with even one of these.

Argentinian town bombarded with giant hailstones (VIDEOS)

Villa Carlos was hit with massive hailstones on Thursday, sending residents of the Argentinian region of Córdoba running for cover.
People shared videos of the snowball-sized hailstones online and described the thunderous noise they made as they hit the ground.

The hail fell for about half an hour in the town of Carlos Paz, damaging a number of trees in the process. In San Antonio de Arredondo, several houses experienced damage caused by the unusual weather.

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https://www.rt.com/news/418362-hailston ... nis-balls/

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Post: # 162138Unread post Blue Frost
Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:45 pm

Nice, the spikes on them will do the worst to you over the round ones.
I would hate to be struck by one, or have my property hit by them.

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Post: # 165149Unread post Gary Oak
Thu May 24, 2018 12:05 am

It didn't look sobad.I imagine a big tornado would have been a disaster though.What on earth is atornado doing in Germany of all places ?

What Happens If You Drive Into a Tornado? Take a Look.
Terrifying footage shows a tornado in western Germany overtaking two cars.

https://news.nationalgeographic.com/201 ... o-science/

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Post: # 165185Unread post Blue Frost
Fri May 25, 2018 5:59 pm

I have drove through one on our freeway, scary time. you couldn't see much but white from the water, and everyone was pulled off the road so I got through it :)
I'm glad it wasn't a strong one, stronger than that one though, but it was nasty.

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Post: # 165186Unread post Blue Frost
Fri May 25, 2018 6:02 pm

That one they had looked more like a dust devil.

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Post: # 165203Unread post Gary Oak
Sat May 26, 2018 2:08 pm

I have never seen a tornado. They don't happen as often up north as they do in Tornado Alley.

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Post: # 165213Unread post Blue Frost
Sat May 26, 2018 3:56 pm

We had several here since i was born, none affecting us much, but one did travel down behind our house around 1974 breaking down trees, and telephone polls. One of our local markets lost a roof, and an Ice house.
Down the road it destroyed Brandenburg. it was really bad, and a sad time.

[video][/video]

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Post: # 165808Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Jun 11, 2018 11:17 am

Do you remember that Kentucky tornado ? What did you do during it ? Were you there or away at the time ?

I never knew that cyclones occurred over the arctic. Can you imagine the inuit trying to survive a cyclone ?

A New Arctic Cyclone Could Be Among the Most Powerful On Record

Weather watchers may be more preoccupied of late with storms popping off in the Gulf of Mexico and the eastern Pacific, but a very unusual cyclone also spun up over the Arctic this week—and it could spell more bad news for the region’s ailing sea ice.

The Arctic is no stranger to cyclones, but the latest no-name storm, which emerged in the Kara sea north of Siberia, has garnered attention both for its size and timing. The storm’s central pressure (a measure of its strength) bottomed out Thursday at about 966 millibars, placing it par with the Great Arctic Cyclone of 2012, one of the most extreme summertime storms in recent memory. That storm reached a minimum central pressure 963-966 millibars, depending on which analysis you trust.

The new storm’s occurrence in June is also noteworthy. Big cyclones like this don’t normally start hitting the Arctic until late summer. The Great Arctic Cyclone of 2012 spun up in August as did a major storm in 2016.

“Preliminarily, this storm could rank in the Top 10 for Arctic Cyclones in June as well as for the summer (June through August) in strength,” Steven Cavallo, a meteorologist at the University of Oklahoma, told Earther via email.

Xiangdong Zhang, a scientist at the International Arctic Research Center who specializes in Arctic cyclones, cited a few factors responsible for the storm’s formation, including low sea ice cover in the North Atlantic which has increased the amount of heat in the atmosphere, a strong temperature gradient between land and sea, and the stratospheric polar vortex, an area of low pressure just above the storm.

“The downward intrusion of this polar vortex intensified [the] storm,” Zhang told Earther via email.

The no-name storm reached peak photogenicity yesterday, with the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration capturing a stunning high-resolution image.

While your typical late-season Arctic cyclones are notorious for chewing up sea ice, what this early season beast will mean for ice remains to be seen.

“This storm is very quick-moving and occurring earlier in the season,” University of California, Irvine Ph.D. candidate Zack Labe told Earther via Twitter direct message. “Its impacts to sea ice are likely not comparable to these other strong cyclones that have occurred later in the summer.”

Labe noted that early summer storms can favor cooler, cloudier conditions, slowing down the loss of sea ice, which typically bottoms out in September. However, he added that a storm of this strength “may precondition the ice for easier melt later in the season.”

Zhang said that due to the storm’s location, it can transport more sea ice out of the Arctic through the passage between Greenland and Svalbard known as the Fram Straight. “This will contribute to Arctic sea ice decrease, in particular thick ice,” he said.

Storm or no, it’s been a weird, bad year for Arctic sea ice so far. After limping along all winter, Bering sea ice was basically gone by May, months ahead of schedule. Even before this storm, sea ice around Svalbard was looking more like it should in September. Overall, Arctic sea ice extent for May was at its second-lowest on record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center’s latest monthly sea ice report released on June 6.

The role of rising temperatures in driving down sea ice is well established. But there’s also growing evidence that climate change could fuel more ice-shredding cyclones. Research going back to the early 2000s suggests Arctic cyclone activity is on the rise. And a study published in April concluded that these storms will become more frequent and intense in the future as the contrast between land and sea temperatures continues to rise.

https://earther.com/a-new-arctic-cyclon ... 1826679817

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Post: # 165813Unread post Blue Frost
Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:16 pm

I was here at home, we ran to the basement when it got bad, the telephone polls on the railway behind our house where all snapped, and a lot of trees down, but we where lucky unlike a lot.
A friend on mine lived in Brandenburg when it happened, it took his house, and everything they had, he was always scared of storms after that.

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Post: # 165825Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Jun 11, 2018 4:58 pm

He probably had PTSD from that storm ever since.

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Post: # 165831Unread post Blue Frost
Mon Jun 11, 2018 5:39 pm

He just ran in our house once when we where having dinner to our basement, he was terrified.

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Post: # 166211Unread post Gary Oak
Tue Jul 03, 2018 9:02 pm

Now this is something nobody ever gets to see.

VIDEO: Whirlwind spotted over fissure 8 lava flow

In the Leilani Estates subdivision, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory field crews monitoring fissure 8 captured this video of a whirlwind above the lava channel.

The vortex of rapidly swirling air picked up hot lava, flinging it meters away.

The scientists maintained a safe distance, using a telephoto lens to take this video. The whirlwind lasted about 10 minutes, starting and stopping without warning.

[video][/video]

http://www.hawaiitribune-herald.com/201 ... lava-flow/

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Post: # 166251Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:18 am

This is from your neck of the woods Bluefrost. If it was this nostoc bacteria or vultures barf , some guys actually ate some of it.

What caused the mysterious Kentucky ‘Meat Shower’ of 1876?

Image

On 3 March 1876, large hunks of flesh fell from the sky over Olympia Springs in Bath County, Kentucky. According to a New York Times article published the following week, the phenomenon occurred right nearby the house of one Allen Crouch, whose wife was outside making soap when it happened.

According to a New York Times article published the following week, the phenomenon occurred right nearby the house of one Allen Crouch, whose wife was outside making soap when it happened. “The meat, which looked like beef, fell all around her. The sky was perfectly clear at the time, and she said it fell like large snowflakes.”

Back at the Crouch residence, a Mr Harrison Gill – whose veracity was described by the The New York Times as “unquestionable” – visited the day after the alleged flesh falls and noted the presence of meat sticking out of the fences and scattered across the ground. At least one of the hunks measured 10 centimetres squared, but most were about 5 x 5 cm. They were apparently fresh when they fell, but having been left out all night, they were now spoiled and dry

Two unidentified gentlemen turned up to taste the meat-rain and declared that it had the flavour of either venison or mutton.

WTF is even going on here?

The first explanation came three months later, when someone called Leopold Brandeis received and analysed some of the specimens that had been preserved in glycerine. He announced that the ‘meat’ was not actually meat at all. “At last we have a proper explanation of this much talked of phenomenon,” it was reported in Scientific American that year. “It has been comparatively easy to identify the substance and to fix its status. The Kentucky ‘wonder’ is no more or less than nostoc.”

A type of cyanobacteria that forms colonies surrounded by a protective gelatinous envelope, nostoc is known to swell up into a translucent jelly-like mass whenever it rains. Because it’s so inconspicuous when dry, for many years, people believed nostoc to float on the breeze until it rained, which caused it to fall from the sky like hail. Colourful nicknames such as “star jelly”, “witch’s butter”, and “star-slubber” were thrown around.

Brandeis identified the Kentucky nostoc as belonging to the species Nostoc craneum, which he described as “flesh-coloured” in The Sanitarian. But really, it honestly just looks like the colour of seaweed. It tastes like frog or spring chicken legs, he said, and had ballooned and fallen upon the Crouch residence when it rained.

But wait a minute, what rain? Didn’t the Crouches report it to be a perfectly clear night? Brandeis!

Fortunately, Brandeis didn’t play a completely useless role in the investigation, because he had given a couple of mystery meat samples to experienced histologist and president of the Newark Scientific Association, Dr. A. Mead Edwards, who said it was likely the lung tissue of a human infant or a horse. Another histologist, Dr. J.W.S. Arnold, studied the specimens and agreed, concluding in The American Journal of Microscopy and Popular Science that they consisted of some kind of animal cartilage and lung tissue.

Eventually, seven samples were examined by several scientists, who confirmed two to be lung tissue, three to be muscular tissue, and two were said to be made of cartilage.

So how did they come to be involved in the Infamous Kentucky Shower of Flesh?

Enter the man with the best explanation for the “shower of quivering flesh” that we’re probably ever going to get – Dr L. D Kastenbine, who wrote in a 1876 edition of the Louisville Medical News that it was, quite literally, a coordinated bout of projectile vulture vomit.

Having obtained a sample of his own, Kastenbine set fire to it and observed that it smelt distinctly of rancid mutton. “The only plausible theory explanatory of this anomalous shower appears to me to be that suggested by the old Ohio farmer – the disgorgement of some vultures that were sailing over the spot, from their immense height, the particles were scattered by the prevailing wind over the ground,” he wrote. “The variety of tissue discovered – muscular, connective, fatty, structureless etc – can be explained only by this theory.”

Two species of vulture are found in Kentucky – the black vulture (Coragyps atratus) and the turkey vulture (Cathartes aura) – both of which are known to projectile vomit their stomach contents away as either a defence mechanism or to make themselves light enough for flight. So maybe?

http://strangesounds.org/2018/07/kentuc ... -1876.html

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Post: # 166257Unread post Blue Frost
Mon Jul 09, 2018 7:56 am

:laugh: Now that is weird.

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Post: # 166259Unread post Renee
Mon Jul 09, 2018 4:35 pm

Puking buzzards...Noice... :gsick:
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Post: # 166262Unread post Blue Frost
Mon Jul 09, 2018 7:14 pm

I worked with a guy who ate a turkey vulture, we sit around at work waiting for his nasty butt to die.
He thought it was just a strange turkey he shot for dinner. :wacko:

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Post: # 166497Unread post Gary Oak
Wed Jul 18, 2018 9:51 pm

This video is quite a sight however you can't see the height of it. It is quite close up though. There is a forewst fire that just started really getting going by here about an hour and a half ago and it is giving this town some much needed shade. It is roasting here in the Okanagan, British Columbias desert.

HomeUS NewsRare 25,000ft ‘firenado’ captured in epic footage (VIDEO)

[video][/video]

https://www.rt.com/usa/433523-firenado- ... -colorado/

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