Trees

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Trees

Post: # 127827Unread post Gary Oak »

These trees are amazingly beautiful.

25+ Of The Most Magnificent Trees In The World

http://memebee.com/bluefrost/viewforum.php?f=12


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Re: Trees

Post: # 127847Unread post Blue Frost »

The link does not point right Gary, but here is a tree for you :)
Rainbow Eucalyptus
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Re: Trees

Post: # 128111Unread post Gary Oak »

Here is some new info backing up that plants actually have intelligence.

http://sorendreier.com/there-is-such-a- ... elligence/

There Is Such a Thing as Plant Intelligence
Posted on February 23, 2016 by Soren Dreier
Author: Simon Worrall

When Paleolithic painters decorated the walls of the caves at Chauvet, in France, they chose stunning motifs of horses and other animals. For them, as for most of us, plants were just there in the background, vegetating away. Sure, a daisy can be cute, a redwood impressive. But compared to a cheetah or an elephant, most plants are, well, boring.
With his new book, Cabaret of Plants: Forty Thousand Years Of Plant Life and the Human Imagination, British author Richard Mabey pushes back against this prejudice to make us see that plants are as thrilling as animals and have been key to our relationship with the world.

Speaking from his home in Norfolk, England, he recalls growing up near Harry Potter’s Whomping Willow; why trees were so often the inspiration for myths and magic; and how a woman in Italy has demonstrated that some plants can remember—and learn from—their experiences.

Nature’s superstars are animals like chimps or cheetahs. You think plants are just as amazing. Convince us.

What can plants do that cheetahs can’t? They can regenerate when 90 percent of their bodies have been eaten away. They can have sex at long distances and communicate with approximately 20 more senses than an animal has. Those are very pragmatic arguments. But I think they’re valuable just because they’re there. We tend to judge plants not as autonomous organisms but in terms of what they can do for us. But they’re astonishing in their own right and deserve to be given the same ethical status as animals.

The seventies classic The Secret Lives of Plants claimed carrots screamed when picked. The “new botany” is making similar claims about plant intelligence. Are those claims just as whacky?

No! [Laughs] I think that seventies generation believed plants were not only intelligent but conscious, which is a dramatically different thing. What the new botany is suggesting is that plants are sensitive and problem-solving but bypass the need for self-consciousness and brain activity that we assume is necessary for intelligence. People who think this are often accused of being anthropocentric, believing that plants are behaving like humans.

The philosopher Daniel Dennett marvelously riposted that critics of this theory are “cerebrocentric,” believing intelligent behavior is not possible without the infinitely superior human brain. What the new work shows is that plants, by means we do not yet fully understand, are capable of behaving like intelligent beings.

They are capable of storing—and learning from—memories of what happens to them.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 128114Unread post Blue Frost »

Trees, and plants are pretty neat, they can talk to each other with smells warning each other, tell when it's time to fertilize in the wind, and feel touch even.
The smell of grass being cut the grass is saying we are being attacked even.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 133988Unread post Gary Oak »

Here is another interestingfinding on plant concsciousness and memory. There has been evidence for many decades already showing that plants and trees have thought, memory and emotions even though they don't have a brain.

Newly Discovered Proteins Show How Plants Have 'Memories' © RIA Novosti. Larisa Saenko

Biologists have discovered special molecules in plants that could explain a decades-old mystery of how plants can form memories.

For the first time ever, researchers have revealed that plants can remember, due to a distinctive inbuilt memory mechanism that enables them to repeatedly bloom and grow seasonally and to react during a drought, heat or prolonged cold. Three years of research and scanning of over 20,000 plants has led to the discovery of prion-like proteins that are capable of building molecular memories.

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Prions are a unique class of infectious proteins. Similarly to brain cells that store information by rearranging molecules in a specific form, prions can also change their shape to arrange protein molecules in a configuration to memorize things. Prions were detected in the early-1980s and play a role in the transmission of certain brain disorders. Several studies of fruit-flies and mice over the past five years have shown that prion-like proteins have the capability to maintain long-term memories.
"This is the first evidence that a plant protein may self-replicate as a prion — this opens up the possibility of protein-based memories in plants," said Indian biologist Dr. Sohini Chakrabortee, a post-doctoral fellow in the laboratory of Prof. Susan Lindquist at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the US. "It is these memories that allow plants to distinguish between a single night of cold and a long winter."

In their study, Chakrabortee and her colleagues searched a plant protein database and identified three proteins with prion-like properties involved in the flowering of plants — and found that at least one of these appears capable of forming molecular memories.

"Prions, we think, are responsible for some really broad, really interesting biology," said Prof. Lindquist. "We have only seen the tip of the iceberg so far."

Read more: http://sputniknews.com/us/20160427/1038 ... z47G9ryTIa
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Re: Trees

Post: # 135684Unread post Blue Frost »

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Re: Trees

Post: # 135695Unread post Gary Oak »

WOW! That is one cool looking tree. Thanks for posting it. I had never heard of this tree before. This is very interesting. I hope that some day they find a way or another one to get the species going again. :thumbsup:
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Re: Trees

Post: # 135697Unread post Blue Frost »

It looks like some arborist would get together, and try to grow one from a cutting, or root maybe. :( sad to see it's the last, and as you said so cool looking.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 136889Unread post Gary Oak »

In the areas around Kamloops BC is a stunningly beautiful tree called the White Willow. When there is a grove of only white willow trees it looks like a surreal or magical white forest.

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Re: Trees

Post: # 139453Unread post Blue Frost »

[video][/video]
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Re: Trees

Post: # 139475Unread post Gary Oak »

I always admire huge trees. I imagine the goings on they have seen like the huge trees in Hanoi that saw the French Indochina years, the American war and the Chinese war or large Douglas firs that would have seen the first Europeans land in Vancouver and verious natives hunting etc...
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Re: Trees

Post: # 139477Unread post Blue Frost »

We had a huge Walnut in our area, biggest in the region I believe, but it was cut down for a failed store :(
It should have been protected, any tree hundreds of years old should be unless a danger, and dying.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 139481Unread post Gary Oak »

That tree would have seen civil war soldiers on duty.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 139483Unread post Blue Frost »

That tree would have see the founding of the country, and before white settlers came in.
I got to see it many times leaving school, but the whole woods is gone now.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 141494Unread post Gary Oak »

This pine tree looks a bit like a bristlecone pine but isn't nearly as old as some of the ones in the USA. i think that there are some redwoods and sequaia's that are older too.


http://www.sciencealert.com/researchers ... -in-europe
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Re: Trees

Post: # 141497Unread post Blue Frost »

I would think there would be older in Europe. I hope it's protected, some rotten people would kill it just to be doing so.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 141548Unread post Gary Oak »

I can see some alahoo akbar freak chopping it down for ala
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Re: Trees

Post: # 141550Unread post Blue Frost »

Just some bad kids would do something if they saw it, and knew, or some idiot just wanting wood like many have been cut for in the past.
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Re: Trees

Post: # 150380Unread post Gary Oak »

Could the communications be transmitted through their energy fields and the proven effect that different words and thoughts alter water ?

Trees Have Social Networks And Complex Relationships

Longtime forest ranger in Germany, Peter Wohlleben, has been studying the forest since he first decided to become a conservationist at 6 years old. He followed his passion for nature throughout college, where he studied forestry and went on to work as an Office Manager of a forestry office. Now he works at the forests in Eifel Gemeinde Hümmel and Wershofen. He recently published a book titled “The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate — Discoveries From a Secret World” that made German forests popular again.

In the book, he explains how trees have their own network, fondly called the “Wood Wide Web,” that keep the trees in a forest interconnected and cause the trees to react to situations in inexplicable ways. Peter took Sally McGrane from the New York Times on a walk through his beloved forest and showed her a pair of beech trees. He said,

“These trees are friends. You see how the thick branches point away from each other? That’s so they don’t block their buddy’s light.” He added, “Sometimes, pairs like this are so interconnected at the roots that when one tree dies, the other one dies, too.”

Sounds a bit like how some humans operate as well, such as when elderly loved ones die within months or even days of each other because they can’t stand to live without the other.

The terms used in Peter’s book are largely anthropomorphic, meaning he regularly applies human terms and verbs to trees. This is something many biologists, who have known for years about the trees’ behavior, take issue with because his choice of language may lead readers astray. For example, he says that the trees “talk” rather than “communicate,” despite the fact that scientists say that they don’t talk in the traditional way that humans would expect.

http://sorendreier.com/trees-have-socia ... tionships/

http://www.trueactivist.com/forest-rang ... ationships
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Re: Trees

Post: # 150382Unread post Blue Frost »

A lot is done by smell, and they do feel with sensory even is not as complex like ours.
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