Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 109099Unread post Gary Oak
Sat Aug 22, 2015 3:27 pm

I was talking to a friend in China and people are still able to pay their landlords. China's internal market I imagine is still keeping China from sinking.

Global stocks in 'panic mode' as Chinese factory slump drags on markets

Wall Street opens lower amid heavy selling across Asia-Pacific and European markets as new data deepens concerns about China’s spluttering economy

The FTSE 100 has hit its lowest level this year after further signs of a weakening Chinese economy spooked global investors.

Britain’s leading share index had fallen 1.5% to 6,272 by Friday afternoon, with Wall Street opening lower as the Dow Jones industrial average fell 123.13 points, or 0.72%, to 16,867.56.

Eight reasons why China’s currency crisis matters to us all

The drops on both sides of the Atlantic mirrored stock markets across Asia-Pacific markets early on Friday after they went into “panic mode” when further signs of a weakening Chinese economy compounded overnight losses on Wall Street and European bourses.

China’s factory sector shrank at its fastest pace in more than six years in August as domestic and export demand dwindled, a private survey showed, adding to worries that the world’s second-largest economy may be slowing sharply and sending financial markets into a tailspin.

Tony Cross, an analyst with Trustnet Direct in London, said the FTSE could be heading for its worst week this year. “As it stands, the FTSE 100 is on course to post its biggest weekly decline of the year so far and there’s not a great deal on the agenda that would appear to have the ability to salvage the situation before the weekend break,” he said.

Connor Campbell, an analyst at Financials, also predicted fresh lows. Oil and mining stocks were “drowning in losses” from the beginning of the day, he said.

European shares also fell to a seven-month low on mounting concerns about China’s economy. The FTSEurofirst 300 index of top European shares fell 1% to 1,462.78 points, its lowest level since January and on course for its biggest weekly fall of the year. Germany’s DAX declined 0.5%, which was some 16% below record highs reached in April.

Elsewhere on Wall Street, the S&P 500 lost 13.94 points, or 0.68%, to 2,021.79 and the Nasdaq composite dropped 76.26 points, or 1.56 percent, to 4,801.23.

China’s surprise devaluation of the yuan and heavy selling in its stock markets in recent weeks have sparked fears that it could be at risk of a hard landing, which would hammer world growth.

Markets in countries whose economic fortunes are closely linked to China’s growth tumbled. Japan’s Nikkei average dropped almost 3% to six-week lows on Friday, while the Kopsi index in South Korea fell 1.92%.


“Global markets are in panic mode as the full scale of China’s slowdown becomes clearer,” said Angus Nicholson at IG Markets in Sydney.

The long-awaited interest rate rise by the US federal reserve, pencilled in for as early as September by many analysts, was now looking much less likely, Nicholson said.


“The potential for further devaluations in the Chinese yuan not only make a US rate hike in September unlikely, but increasingly even put a December rate hike at risk.”

The Hang Seng stock index in Hong Kong was down 1.92% while the Shanghai Composite index was 4.2% lower.



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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 109112Unread post Blue Frost
Sat Aug 22, 2015 7:25 pm

It's more the international investments, and they just sold off tons of gold.
i feel for the average worker trying to make it, it's not their fault like it wouldn't be one of ours for the crummy governments.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 109198Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Aug 24, 2015 6:41 pm

I stole t his from another forum . This poster makes sense.

China Market Plunge - If you read between the lines


is, has been intentionally orchestrated from within, in order to expedite the collapse of the US Dollar. :)
China will declare it's brief flirtation with Capitalism a failure & revert to the Old World Economy, during which they will want to collect from their Debtors, specifically, the US.
Knowing the US couldn't possibly pay off it's debt to them, they will demand action from the UN.
During this crisis, US stocks will continue to fall to the point where the Dollar will become worthless on the Int'l market, & China will arise as the New World Economic Superpower without any Military action. :)
A nice, neat & clean takeover. Completely Bloodless, one which Sun Tszu woulde be proud! :thumbup:


http://www.vancouversun.com/business/st ... story.html


http://money.cnn.com/2015/08/23/investi ... k-markets/

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 109205Unread post Blue Frost
Mon Aug 24, 2015 7:21 pm

It does makes sense, and with George Soros advising them It's likely true.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 110209Unread post Gary Oak
Tue Sep 08, 2015 3:17 am

China's economic crash appears to be happening this September 2015.

http://chinawatchcanada.blogspot.ca/201 ... burst.html

Global finance chiefs sought to contain tensions over currency movements with China suggesting its August devaluation won’t be repeated any time soon and Japan labeling the Chinese unhelpful.
Zhou Xiaochuan, governor of China’s central bank, told a meeting of Group of 20 finance ministers in Ankara that a stock- market bubble in his country had “burst,” according to Japan’s Taro Aso. Another official present at the talks said China had presented the country’s situation as a new normal.
“It wasn’t enough,” Aso told reporters. “They may have tried to be constructive, but they weren’t detailed enough.”
China is on the defensive as its slowing economy and market turbulence send shock waves through emerging markets just as the U.S. is preparing to raise interest rates. With the MSCI emerging market index down 18 percent so far this year, a draft communique prepared before the meeting cited “recent volatility in financial markets” and the need to monitor potential spillovers.
The Shanghai Composite index has lost about 40 percent since reaching a three-year high in June. Zhou used the word “burst” three times in his explanation of what is going on with the stock market, according to a Japanese finance ministry official.
The Chinese delegation said they were trying to shift to a different growth model with as little disruption as possible, according to an international official participating in the talks. They said were trying to reduce indebtedness and are planning measures that will regulate swings in the stock market.
“China is definitely trying to play a constructive role,” Canadian Finance Minister Joe Oliver said in an interview. “It is the second-largest economy in the world and so when it slows down it has global implications. That is I think what we are dealing with.”
Stability Forecast
China’s surprise decision to revalue the yuan as it tried to contain the stock market turmoil caused the currency to drop the most in 21 years last month, triggering exchange-rate declines elsewhere in the emerging world on concern a weaker yuan will hurt countries exporting to China.
The Chinese delegation said the currency move wasn’t an attempt to grab exports from their international competitors and that explanation was accepted by the other nations, according to the international official.
The Chinese asked for specific references to their problems to be left out of the final communique, a euro-area aide said.
“No one can predict exactly on the market volatility, but I’m confident that the renminbi exchange rate will be more or less stable around the equilibrium level,” Yi Gang, China’s deputy central bank governor, said in an interview as he headed into Friday’s session. “The Chinese economy’s fundamentals are fine.”
U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew told Chinese Finance Minister Lou Jiwei in Ankara on Friday that it’s important for China to signal that it will allow market pressures to drive the yuan up as well as down. China should avoid persistent exchange- rate misalignments and refrain from competitive devaluation, Lew said, according to a Treasury statement.
Fed Hikes
China’s slowdown comes as the Federal Reserve is considering raising U.S. interest rates for the first time in nine years.
Vice Chairman Stanley Fischer explained the Fed’s very gradual, cautious approach to tightening monetary policy in a presentation to delegates, according to an official with knowledge of the discussions. Fischer
The draft statement seen by Bloomberg News before the talks began said that in line with the improving outlook, “monetary policy tightening is more likely in some advanced economies, which may remain one of the main sources of uncertainty in financial markets.”
Some delegates from emerging markets said at the meeting that the Fed should get on with raising rates to end uncertainty, according to an official who was present.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 110220Unread post Blue Frost
Tue Sep 08, 2015 11:46 am

That's the big problem with currency on paper/Fiat currency, nothing backing stuff up.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 112848Unread post Gary Oak
Fri Oct 02, 2015 5:13 pm

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-o ... e26609235/

Employees working on an assembly line producing Mercedes-Benz cars at a factory of Beijing Benz Automotive Co. (BBAC) in Beijing, China, Aug. 31, 2015. Activity in China's vast manufacturing sector contracted for a second straight month in September, an official survey showed on Oct. 1, 2015, (Kim Kyung Hoon/REUTERS)

Global economy loses steam as Chinese, European factories falter


Sumanta Dey And Ian Chua

BENGALURU/SYDNEY — Reuters


Published Thursday, Oct. 01, 2015 5:27AM EDT

Last updated Thursday, Oct. 01, 2015 7:38AM EDT


The world economy lost momentum in September, with China’s vast factory sector shrinking again and euro zone manufacturing growth weakening slightly, both casualties of waning global demand.

The latest business surveys across Asia and Europe paint a darkening picture and are likely to prompt more calls for central banks around the world to loosen monetary policy even further.


Stocks posted their worst quarter since 2011, but had sharp gains on the closing session. Bobbi Rebell reports.

Markets

Video: Brutal quarter for stocks

“The data probably increases the case for more stimulus in certain parts of the world, especially from the People’s Bank of China and the European Central Bank,” said Philip Shaw, economist at Investec in London.

“Those economies that are at less advanced paths of the recovery cycle – the key example is the euro zone, where we’re looking at more disinflation – may well find more stimulus is in order.”

Surveys of China’s factory and services sectors showed the world’s second largest economy may be cooling more rapidly than earlier thought, with deeper job cuts.

Taken together with a stock market crash in Shanghai during the summer and a surprise devaluation of the Chinese yuan, the data highlight just how difficult it will be for policymakers to steer China’s economy out of the biggest slowdown in decades.

“Two straight months of manufacturing sector contraction with a depressed equity market suggests China’s third-quarter GDP growth is likely to have slowed to 6.4 per cent,” economists at ANZ said.

CHINA WORRIES

The Chinese government is due to release third-quarter GDP data on Oct. 19. It reported steady growth of 7 per cent in both the first two quarters of the year, a figure that many analysts and investors say is overstating the actual rate.

The official manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index in China inched up to 49.8 in September from 49.7, but still suggested conditions were deteriorating. A private survey focusing on small factories pointed to an even sharper cooldown. Readings below 50 signal a contraction.

China is a major importer of raw materials, especially from commodity producers such as Australia, South Africa and Canada, and an exporter of finished goods. A slowdown there is likely to be felt in global economies already grappling with weak demand and lacklustre growth and inflation.

Its effects are already being felt by regional trade partners such as South Korea, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and India where manufacturing activity either contracted or dipped in September.

Concerns over China and global market volatility figured high on a list of reasons the U.S. Federal Reserve did not raise interest rates last month.

A U.S. survey of manufacturers from the Institute of Supply Management due later on Thursday is likely to show factory activity there is dangerously close to contraction, underlining the global nature of the current manufacturing downturn.

The U.S. ISM factory index is forecast to slip to 50.6 from 51.1, according to a Reuters poll of 87 economists.

MORE ECB STIMULUS AS PRICES DROP

Signs that China is losing steam have dented commodity prices, notably oil, and fuelled a global disinflation trend since June last year, leading a record number of central banks to ease policy.

In the euro zone, where the central bank is six months into a 1.1 trillion euro asset purchase programme, inflation dipped below zero again in September, an early estimate showed on Wednesday.

Combined with the PMI survey data that showed factory growth weakened slightly last month, with slowing new orders and output, that is likely to prompt the ECB to expand its stimulus programme.

Markit’s final manufacturing PMI was 52.0 last month, lower than August’s 52.3. An index measuring output that feeds into a composite PMI, due on Monday and seen as a good guide to growth, fell to 53.4 from 53.9.

ECB policymakers, led by President Mario Draghi, have hinted the 60-billion-euro-a-month bond-buying scheme could be enhanced in size or duration if inflation is seen missing its goal of near 2 per cent even by 2017.

With the latest factory PMI showing manufacturers started cutting prices again to drum up new business, it is unlikely inflation will start to rise meaningfully anytime soon.

Factories in Europe’s number one economy, Germany, performed better, however, driven by strong output from consumer goods producers and rising new orders.

The PMIs also showed French manufacturing grew faster than first thought in September, while British factory growth lost steam and shed jobs for the first time since 2013.

The drag on the UK economy is likely to weigh on the Bank of England which is considering when the appropriate time is to raise interest rates from the current 0.50 per cent, where they have stayed since March 2009.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 113867Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:35 pm

Xi Jinping will not be able to shuffle China's economy problems off to the next president. From the little that I have heard from friends over there he is doing a very good job of cracking down on China's outlandish corruption issues. I do believe that if Canada's population was hopelessly corrupt ,lacking ambition and lazy Canada too would quickly become a third world nation.

China concerns leave central banks in difficult spot

The coming week will provide clues on whether the global economy is escaping from its lackluster growth rut, amid growing concerns of another downturn which central banks have few tools left to fight.

China has become the focal point for economists as they fear a hard landing there could send countries that have only just escaped from the doldrums reeling back into recession.

Beijing will publish September trade data on Tuesday and inflation on Wednesday and any significant deviation from expectations could set the tone for the week.

The deluge of data from China in coming weeks is likely to point to further weakness, reinforcing expectations Beijing will roll out more stimulus measures to ward off a sharper slowdown.

"After the past few turbulent weeks and continued concerns with regard to the world's second largest economy, the data will also attract great attention in view of GDP figures due out on October 19," said economists at DZ Bank.

In the euro zone, final inflation numbers for some member countries will be published during the week with the bloc's reading on Friday expected to confirm prices fell 0.1 percent annually last month.

Since March the European Central Bank has been pumping 60 billion euros a month into the economy as part of its battle to drive up inflationary pressures but the program has so far failed to spark price rises.

Expectations are that it will eventually have to be extended beyond its planned completion date.

"We think additional ECB easing is in the pipeline," said Martina von Terzi at UniCredit.

"New stimulus is likely to reflect the ECB's heightened risk aversion, increasing awareness by the Governing Council that the bank's inflation projections are too optimistic, and the need to counter upward pressure on the euro."

But with the ECB's next rate meeting fast approaching, most bets have already been made and the hawks seem to be winning, so there may not be any extension or expansion of quantitative easing for now.

Next week some of the ECB's biggest guns are speaking so if their thinking is shifting, it will be the time to send fresh signals before the Oct. 22 gathering of rate setters in Malta.

In contrast, other major central banks long ago set the printing presses running to flood their economies with newly created money, spending around $7 trillion to defend themselves during the global financial crisis.

Indeed, markets are now focusing on when the U.S. Federal Reserve pulls the trigger and tightens policy for the first time in nearly a decade after it took a pass last month.

The minutes of that meeting showed the Fed thought the economy was close to warranting a rate hike, but policymakers wanted firmer evidence the global economic slowdown was not knocking America off course.

Subsequent economic data has shown a sharp slowdown in hiring by U.S. employers.

Retail sales numbers on Wednesday ahead of industrial production and Michigan consumer sentiment on Friday will indicate if there is still a chance of a rise this year.

Inflation data is due on Thursday and four voting members of the Federal Open Market Committee also speak next week.

The International Monetary Fund has urged the Fed and Japanese and European central banks to wait for more signs of recovery before tightening. IMF Chief Christine Lagarde on Thursday repeated her plea to Fed Chair Janet Yellen to stay her hand.

The Bank of England left borrowing costs at a record low 0.5 percent this week, saying the outlook for British inflation in coming months looked weaker than it previously thought. Official figures on Tuesday will likely say it remained at zero last month.

Other central banks meeting next week include those of Peru, Chile, Indonesia, and South Korea but no policy change is expected from any of them.

It had been hoped emerging countries would be the driver behind the global recovery but many of those economies are now in turmoil and Lagarde told policymakers gathered in Peru for the IMF's annual meeting the world was stuck in a "new mediocre" growth pattern.

Rate setters have little room for error in a low-growth world in which over-leveraged and commodity-dependent emerging economies and a slowing China are major risks, top international financiers said at the IMF meeting on Thursday.

(Editing by Toby Chopra)

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 113869Unread post Blue Frost
Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:39 pm

I just read in their third quarter they slowed down more slipping further.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 113871Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:45 pm

China I have heard has been crashing for some time. Canada and especially BC has a very successful scamming dirty money out of Asia industry. Once here though they have to deal with quality law enforcement, surveillance and high taxes

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 113873Unread post Blue Frost
Mon Oct 12, 2015 11:47 pm

I have felt it myself loosing in my Asian stocks, it affects world stocks also so I lost on some others.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 123588Unread post Gary Oak
Tue Jan 05, 2016 6:37 pm

its good to be back in Canada.

China battles to shore up stocks, yuan after globe-shaking slide
Reuters
By By Pete Sweeney and Samuel Shen – 15 hours ago

https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/china ... ector.html

By Pete Sweeney and Samuel Shen

SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China struggled to shore up shaky sentiment on Tuesday a day after its stock indexes and yuan currency tumbled, rattling markets worldwide, but analysts warned investors to buckle up for more wild price swings in the months ahead.

Stocks fell more than 2 percent in early trade, prompting fears that exchanges were set for a second day of panic selling after a 7 percent dive on Monday set off a new "circuit breaker" mechanism, suspending trade nation-wide for the first time.

But both the central bank and the stock regulator reacted quickly, and major indexes recouped most of their initial losses despite a late afternoon scare.

The People's Bank of China (PBOC) poured nearly $20 billion into money markets, its largest cash injection since September, and traders suspected it was using state banks to prop up the yuan at the same time.

The China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), for its part, announced it was planning new rules to further restrict share sales by major stakeholders in listed companies, and said it would further tweak the circuit breaker mechanism amid criticism that it had fueled Monday's sell-off.

The blue-chip CSI300 index <.CSI300> ended up 0.3 percent at 3,478.78 points after bouncing in a 4 percent range, while the Shanghai Composite Index <.SSEC> dipped 0.3 percent to 3,287.71 points.

How long any reprieve will last is still in question.

In a dilemma similar to the U.S. Federal Reserve's recent tapering of its stimulus program, Beijing is trying to orderly unwind a massive and unprecedented stock market rescue last summer, while pressing ahead with reforms to allow markets to have a greater say in determining the yuan's value.

Its heavy handed approach to the stock market crash and its surprise devaluation of the yuan in August had called its policymaking into question and sparked global market volatility.

CONFIDENCE GAME

Keeping China's notoriously volatile and speculative stock markets stable will be a trick. Some market watchers say the government's interventions have kept stock valuations excessively high given the cooling economy and falling profits.

"Today's problem is the legacy of the government's heavy-handed intervention last year," said Yang Hai, analyst at Kaiyuan Securities.

"The patient was desperately looking for treatment but took the wrong medicine that only prolonged the illness."

Government actions have also suppressed trading volume, leaving the market more susceptible to big price swings, and discouraged foreign investors who tend to hold stocks longer than hit-and-run local retail investors.

"We've been waiting for a market drop like this for a long time," said Samuel Chien, a partner of Shanghai-based hedge fund manager BoomTrend Investment Management Co.

"The economy is poor, stock valuation is still high, and the yuan keeps sliding, showing capital outflows are accelerating. The market drop is overdue."

Indeed, some retail investors told Reuters said they would steering clear of stocks after being burned this week.

One 23-year-old from Guangzhou who gave his surname as Hu said he had bought stocks on Monday afternoon, assuming that the circuit breaker would never be triggered, only to see it kick in well before the market close, locking in a 5 percent loss.

He took advantage of the mild bounce on Tuesday to exit his position, saying he had "learned a lesson in blood."

YUAN RISK

China is also wrestling with market expectations that it will allow further depreciation of the yuan, a scenario many traders believe is inevitable as the economy slows and more investors pull capital out of the country in search of better returns elsewhere.

Authorities let the yuan weaken 4.7 percent against the dollar last year, a record yearly loss. It slipped to fresh 4-1/2 year lows on Monday, which some blamed for aggravating the stock market slump.

While the onshore yuan market has stabilized in response to central bank blandishments, the offshore yuan continues to price in deeper discounts; trading at 6.6373 per dollar, 1.7 percent weaker than the onshore currency.

The gap is so large as to make them effectively different currencies, increasing risks for companies and traders.

It also increases the likelihood of market-distorting arbitrage strategies, which the PBOC has shown signs of being concerned about. It recently moved to suspend foreign banks suspected of implementing aggressive strategies to profit from the rate difference, and more enforcement is expected.

If Tuesday's policy-induced market respite proves temporary, regulators might have to freeze new share offerings again, extend a ban on certain share sales and keep the "national team" of brokerages and asset managers on the hook to keep buying and holding stocks at a loss.

This could entail the postponement of already delayed reforms, such as moving to a U.S.-style IPO registration system that would reduce opportunities for corruption and regulatory meddling.

Such an eventuality would further dent confidence in the China Securities Regulatory Commission and in the wider financial regulatory framework to manage increasingly complex markets as the economy slows.

"Further government intervention on a big scale would amount to injustice in a market whose reputation has already been suffering," said Yang of Kaiyuan Securities.

(Additional reporting by Samuel Shen and the Shanghai Newsroom; Editing by Kim Coghill)

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 123589Unread post Blue Frost
Tue Jan 05, 2016 6:40 pm

I have not got my investment papers for this month, but I'm sure it got his also. I'm waiting for tax time to see if Ill pull it all out or not.
It's uncalled for how it's all manipulated creating a bigger bubble for later to pop.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 124176Unread post Gary Oak
Mon Jan 11, 2016 3:03 pm


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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 124337Unread post Gary Oak
Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:24 pm

At least I am still doing good.

Wall Street steadies as oil plunges, China woes deepen

By By Lewis Krauskopf | Reuters – Mon, 11 Jan, 2016 5:03 PM EST

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Wall Street rallied to finish slightly higher on Monday, steadying after a brutal start to 2016, while beaten-down oil prices plunged further after a fresh tumble for Chinese stocks.

In a volatile session in which U.S. stocks were lower much of the day, the S&P 500 and the Dow rallied to close higher after last week posting their worst-ever five-day starts to the year.

China's main stock indexes <.SSEC> <.CSI300> each dropped more than 5 percent on Monday. Oil prices fell to new 12-year lows, as concerns over China hurt commodity prices broadly.

Noting that weak signs out of China and falling oil prices have recently pressured stocks, Chuck Carlson, chief executive officer at Horizon Investment Services in Hammond, Indiana, said: "You had both those things happen today and the market managed to finish upward.

"The fact that it did hold up for the same reasons that it seemed to go down last week, that’s a victory," Carlson said. "Today was kind of a nice, perhaps, first brick in the bottom being put in place."

The Dow Jones industrial average <.DJI> gained 52.12 points, or 0.32 percent, to 16,398.57, the S&P 500 <.SPX> was up 1.64 points, or 0.09 percent, to 1,923.67 and the Nasdaq Composite <.IXIC> lost 5.64 points, or 0.12 percent, to 4,637.99. Energy shares <.SPNY> led declines, while the healthcare sector <.SPXHC> fell 1.2 percent as Celgene Corp weighed after posting a disappointing financial outlook.

Investors were looking to U.S. corporate earnings to help provide confidence, with major banks reporting later this week, despite expectations for a second consecutive quarter of overall declining earnings.

"We are going to start to get into earnings season and that is going to begin to be the bigger cue for this market," Carlson said.

The pan-European FTSEurofirst 300 index <.FTEU3> gave up initial gains and ended down 0.4 percent as commodity shares tracked oil and metals prices lower.

MSCI's broadest gauge of stocks globally <.MIWD00000PUS> slipped 0.4 percent after registering its biggest weekly decline in more than four years.

Oil prices fell for a sixth straight session to start the new year, as traders cited fears over slowing demand in China.

U.S. crude prices settled down 5.3 percent at $31.41 a barrel, while benchmark Brent dropped 6 percent to $31.55 a barrel.

"The focus is still on China and the demand concerns in China moving forward into 2016," said Tony Headrick, an energy market analyst at CHS Hedging LLC.

The U.S. dollar was up 0.3 percent against a basket of currencies <.DXY>, while the euro fell 0.7 percent against the dollar .

"Modestly improved risk sentiment was enough to cause the euro to lose some ground against the U.S. dollar," said Joe Manimbo, senior market analyst at Western Union Business Solutions in Washington.

U.S. Treasury yields inched higher in volatile trading. Benchmark 10-year notes were down 12/32 in price to yield 2.1736 percent, from 2.131 percent late on Friday.

Copper prices fell 2.2 percent to 6-1/2-year lows as the Chinese stock declines reinforced worries about demand in the world's biggest consumer of industrial metals.

Spot gold fell 0.8 percent but still hovered at more than two-month highs.

The 19-market Thomson Reuters CoreCommodity Index <.TRJCRB> sank 2.6 percent to a 13-1/2-year low.

(Additional reporting by Gertrude Chavez-Dreyfuss, Catherine Ngai and Tariro Mzezewa in New York, Marc Jones and Amanda Cooper in London; Editing by Bernadette Baum, Nick Zieminski and Dan Grebler)

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 124339Unread post Blue Frost
Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:28 pm

Funny thing is Oil being down used to be a great thing for the economy, so whats the issue ?
They can say manufacturing in China has slower, but everything else is good.
Also with oil low, it's not exactly showing it at the pumps still being about $2 a gallon here. By my guess it should be around $1.45 a gallon.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 124341Unread post Gary Oak
Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:35 pm

Our gas prices are dropping but gas is still far more expensive here than it is in the USA.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 124343Unread post Blue Frost
Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:38 pm

That's really pathetic since your country can produce fuel just as cheep as ours.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 124345Unread post Gary Oak
Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:41 pm

Americans pay far less for Canadian gas than Canadians do.

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Re: Chinas Economy Is Tanking Now

Post: # 124347Unread post Blue Frost
Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:44 pm

yeah we have a deal with Opec is why, but still we have no reason, and Canada for not supplying our own.

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