Coffee

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Blue Frost
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 113041Unread post Blue Frost »

Genetic expression, You might have a disposition for it, but don't have to get it.
you don't have to get what they have if you change maybe a few things like diet, or maybe a polluted location, mindset. .


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RDL

Re: Coffee

Post: # 113044Unread post RDL »

I don't really care whether or not I get Alzheimer's. I'm sure by then I'll have already done all the things I was meant to accomplish in life.
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 113046Unread post Blue Frost »

You hope, but most people fail at doing what they want to do in life.
It's not a good way to end it either, you come in, and out of your minds reality loosing more, and more as you go.
:sorry:
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RDL

Re: Coffee

Post: # 113059Unread post RDL »

If I'm losing reality, then I won't care.
Reality isn't all that fun to begin with.
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Blue Frost
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 113061Unread post Blue Frost »

Nope it's really not is it, but the alternatives isn't at all good.
i was thinking today that I want to change things in my life, i want them better so i'm going to work on it even if it kills me.
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RDL

Re: Coffee

Post: # 113063Unread post RDL »

I like to think Tetris is helping me mentally.
In fact, today I made it up to Level 9 :)
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Blue Frost
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 113066Unread post Blue Frost »

Some of those games are good for you as long as you don't spend all day on them.
I dated a girl once, and he little niece was the best on tetris I have ever seen, she would play it a lot though.
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RDL

Re: Coffee

Post: # 113069Unread post RDL »

Don't worry, I'm not spending my whole library internet session on Tetris.
I'm also looking at pics on Google Image Search and on YouTube for me to rub my dinky to tonight.
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 113073Unread post Blue Frost »

:woot: :facepalm: Way to much info again.

This is all you need RDL
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 133982Unread post Gary Oak »

I once took far too many caffien pills once twenty years ago and my blood sugar went really hairy scary. It may have been a little close to having an actual overdose.

he Other White Powder That Can Kill You
A spoonful of powdered caffeine is enough to kill someone—near instantly. How the deadly white powder slid past the FDA.
Wade Sweatt died from a white powder. Immediately after trying it, the 24-year-old told his wife that it was “making [him] sick,” his parents recalled in a statement. Then, his heart stopped working.
“What followed was several long terrible days, in which Wade had cardiac arrest over and over again,” his parents wrote. “We finally had to make the terrible decision to take him off life support, after it was clear that he was brain dead.”
The white powder Sweatt ingested was not cocaine. It was the same substance found in a bar of chocolate or your morning coffee, only packaged in a more concentrated form: powdered caffeine.

According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), ingesting a single teaspoon of powdered caffeine is “roughly equivalent” to drinking 28 cups of coffee at once. In large amounts, it can cause vomiting and diarrhea. Overdosing can result in a “rapid or dangerously erratic heartbeat, seizures, and death.”
Even more frightening is how easy it is to take too much pure caffeine. One brand recommended that consumers use a “1/32 teaspoon” to measure a safe amount. For comparison, a “pinch” of salt is generally considered to be one-sixteenth of a teaspoon.
According to ABC News, Sweatt had been searching the Internet for conversion tables shortly before his death in order to determine a safe amount. His calculation was fatal. Sweatt died in June of 2014. The month before, high school wrestler Logan Stiner also overdosed on the powder and passed away days before graduation.
Since their untimely deaths, the FDA has posted a consumer advisory about powdered caffeine and written six warning letters to companies that sell it. But the federal agency has not yet banned the product. That seeming delay has prompted the Center for Science and the Public Interest (CSPI), a nonprofit organization focused on nutrition and food safety, to urge the FDA to take swifter action.
“It is astonishing that a substance that is fatal for adults in the amount of two tablespoons is sold cheaply over the Internet as loose powder in large bags without clear warnings,” said CSPI Regulatory Affairs Director Laura MacCleery in a statement.
FDA officials met with the families of both Sweatt and Stiner in December of 2014 and again this Tuesday.
The FDA told The Daily Beast that it cannot discuss the pending CSPI petition to ban powdered caffeine but a spokesperson said that “the FDA takes concerns raised about safety of these types of products very seriously and we are considering the matters raised by the petition and giving it our careful attention.”
For the CSPI, the wait has already been too long for comfort.
In her statement, MacCleery noted that after “a quick Google search,” the watchdog group was able to order a bottle of liquid caffeine from South Korea that was strong enough to “kill nearly seven people.”
“We easily purchased large bags of pure powder sufficient to kill several dozen people, and a gallon jug of what looks like water but is actually a highly caffeinated liquid—a cup of which would be a fatal dose,” she added.
As the National Institute for Drug Abuse notes, powdered caffeine is especially appealing to young people who want “added caffeine stimulation” and to those who believe the inconclusive evidence that caffeine can assist in weight loss. And before the high-profile deaths of Sweatt and Stiner, it was even easier to access than it is now.
The FDA’s first action against the powdered caffeine market came in July 2014 after the agency learned of Stiner’s fatal overdose. That tragedy prompted an official warning, which urged consumers to avoid the product and stressed that it is “nearly impossible to accurately measure pure powdered caffeine with common kitchen measuring tools and you can easily consume a lethal amount.”
GET THE BEAST IN YOUR INBOX!

The following summer, the agency wrote five warning letters to companies that were distributing powdered caffeine and allegedly violating the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.
One company was recommending that consumers use a quarter-teaspoon tool to measure a recommended dose of approximately one-third of a quarter teaspoon (PDF).
Another product label for a bag of powdered caffeine included information about how many milligrams of caffeine were in a quarter-teaspoon, even though the maximum recommended dose size was only one-sixteenth of a teaspoon (PDF). If someone were to have mistaken the quarter-teaspoon measure for a recommendation, they would have downed the equivalent of eight cups of coffee in a heartbeat.
And given how minuscule pure caffeine doses are supposed to be, many of the packages contained an alarming quantity of the powder. One package cited by the FDA contained over 125,000 servings, which is enough for three people to have one dose per day for over 100 years (PDF).
Four out of five of these products were taken off the market after the warning letters were sent out, the FDA told The Daily Beast, and the lone holdout is “no longer marketed to consumers.”
Just last month, they had to send another letter to a company that was falsely marketing powdered caffeine as a fat-burning drug (PDF).
So far, the FDA has not received any new reports of deaths resulting from powdered caffeine but a spokesperson said that they are still “concerned” about its sale and will “consider every legal option in determining the best path forward.”
But the CSPI—and the families of the teenagers who overdosed—believe that the only acceptable action is a categorical ban. A ban, they note, would allow the FDA to seize powdered caffeine at the border and penalize any company that sells it.
“Any action less than a ban would be confirmation that FDA has lost its way,” said MacCleery.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2 ... l-you.html
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 133983Unread post Blue Frost »

Sad he died, i wounder if they tried giving him activated charcoal, or pump it from his stomach with a laxative also.
If you ever do that Gary, or anyone eat some bananas, or dark leafy greens, lots of water also. I think the magnesium, and potassium counters it.
Oh, and get to the emergency asap.
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 142932Unread post Gary Oak »

I am not willing to quit coffee but the nicotine had to go.

Surprising ways that caffeine affects your body and brain

Coffee, tea, and cola are just three substances many of us look to for our daily caffeine fix. But what exactly is happening to our brain and body when we take in this colorless, odorless, tasteless drug?

From our bloodstream to our brain, caffeine affects multiple areas of our body in different ways that ultimately leads to more than just a boost in wake-fullness: Caffeine can also improve our mood, enhance focus, and reduce appetite.

Here's a graphic that shows what caffeine is doing in our bodies hours after consumption.

Skye Gould/Business Insider
Kevin Loria also contributed to this article.

CHECK OUT: What caffeine does to your body and brain »
SEE ALSO: What 9 common drugs including caffeine, weed, and booze do to your brain »
NOW WATCH: 8 horrible things excessive coffee drinking can do to you

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-caff ... dy-2016-10
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Blue Frost
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 142935Unread post Blue Frost »

i don't get much caffeine, never liked coffee, but the smell is nice in the morning.
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Gary Oak
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Coffee

Post: # 160794Unread post Gary Oak »

One thing that happens when I stop drinking coffee is tons of pain and especially a continual headache :facepalm: SOme of these are not good. Coffee damages teeth and stains them.The lack of daily adrenaline and dopamine can lead to frequent headaches. Depending on how your body responds, you could either lose or gain weight. You could sleep better and this may expain my sleeping difficulties.

You could feel sick (but not for long) Headaches aren’t the only painful symptom of caffeine withdrawal. Those who stop consuming coffee have reported side effects like depression, anxiety, dizziness, flu-like symptoms, insomnia, irritability, mood swings, and sluggishness. Here’s the good news: you won’t feel this way forever. Experts say that most of the physical symptoms of caffeine withdrawal will pass after the first two days, while the rest of the side effects won’t last beyond a week or two.

You could have a healthier smile Coffee is highly acidic, which means it erodes your tooth enamel and stains your teeth with every sip. Cut the caffeine and you’ll protect your teeth from a lifetime of erosion, leading to a whiter (and more confident!) smile. Here are some other habits you didn't realize were harming your teeth .

Here's some good news, i am getting antioxidants :thumbsup: You could miss out on antioxidants , Coffee is the number-one source of antioxidants in the average American’s diet, according to research from the University of Scranton. Numerous studies have found that drinking more than three cups of coffee per day could decrease your risk of everything from breast cancer to Parkinson’s, as well as increase bone health. Unfortunately, it goes without saying that if you’re cutting back on coffee, you’ll be losing the health benefits, too. Thankfully, it’s not hard to make up for your regular coffee intake by replacing it with antioxidant-rich tea, fruits, and veggies. Check out our guide to the best antioxidant-rich produce .

You could have difficulty concentrating . This one is interesting :scratch: Fatigue and irritability are two side effects of a no-coffee diet that also contribute to lack of concentration, according to nutrition blogger Justin Caba. Caba told MedicalDaily that as he experienced caffeine withdrawal after cutting back on coffee, his productivity at work severely decreased. Blame it on the lack of stimulants you get from a dose of coffee, as well as the increase in adenosine, that pesky hormone that makes you feel tired. To counteract the loss of concentration, try chewing minty gum to keep your brain alert and on task. When participants did so in a study published in the British Journal of Psychology , they had quicker reaction times and more accurate results on their tasks, especially toward the end of the session. Plus, after just a week without caffeine, you’ll find that your productivity has increased because you no longer experience the inevitable afternoon crash after a morning cup of coffee. Here are some other myths and facts about how coffee affects your body .

You could become constipated

You could feel calmer If too much caffeine has ever left you squirming in your chair or jiggling your leg, it’s time to say goodbye to your double espresso shots. Since caffeine is a stimulant, it naturally raises levels of adrenaline and stress hormones in your body. Ditching caffeine will make you feel less stressed and anxious .

10 things that happen to your body when you stop drinking coffee

http://www.businessinsider.com/10-thing ... ee-2017-12
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Coffee

Post: # 160809Unread post Blue Frost »

I wonder what happens when you start drinking it, I don't drink coffee.
Love the smell of fresh ground though :)
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Coffee and cancer

Post: # 163451Unread post Reverse Flash »

Image

I need to cut down on my coffee in take. Maybe just 1 cup a week. Bad for my bones too. Dehydrates the body.

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/a ... -warnings/
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Coffee and cancer

Post: # 163452Unread post Blue Frost »

If people would look up how food is made, and processed a lot have cancer causing agents in them.
Your food is sometimes bleached, sometimes gassed with some strange stuff, some food we don't even know since it's from other places without regulations like ours.
Some food isn't even food like some of the plastic rice people was eating.
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Coffee and cancer

Post: # 163453Unread post Blue Frost »

I think people should sue to be rid of fluoride in our water supply, it's poison, and it's in most foods.
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Coffee

Post: # 163838Unread post Gary Oak »

Seeing as it is very painful to quit, I am always happy to hear of good things coffee does :pardon:

Coffee Causes Widespread Brain Entropy
and that's a good thing

Basic neuroscience teaches us how individual brain cells communicate with each other, like neighbours chatting over the garden fence. This is a vital part of brain function. Increasingly however neuroscientists are zooming out and studying the information processing that happens within and between neural networks across the entire brain, more akin to the complex flow of digital information constantly pulsing around the globe.

This has led them to realise the importance of what they call “brain entropy” – intense complexity and irregular variability in brain activity from one moment to the next, also marked by greater long-distance correlations in neural activity. Greater entropy, up to a point, is indicative of more information processing capacity, as opposed to low entropy – characterised by orderliness and repetition – which is seen when we are in a deep sleep or coma.

A new study in Scientific Reports is the first to examine whether and how ingesting a psychostimulant – in this case caffeine – affects brain entropy. The results show caffeine causes a widespread increase in cerebral entropy. This dose of neural anarchy is probably welcome, especially considered in light of another new paper, in PLOS One, which finds greater brain entropy correlates with higher verbal IQ and reasoning ability.


For the caffeine study, Da Chang at Hangzhou Normal University in China and other researchers scanned the brains of 60 participants – 30 men and women – at baseline, and also after they ingested a 200mg caffeine pill (roughly approximate to two cups of coffee). It was a “resting-state” scan meaning that the participants simply lay in the scanner doing nothing. For both scans, Chang’s team analysed changing neural activity levels from one moment to the next, and looked for correlations in activity across and within brain regions to calculate brain entropy. They also measured changes in cerebral blood flow across the brain.

The scans showed that caffeine increased brain entropy across nearly the entire cerebral cortex, but especially in “lateral prefrontal cortex, the DMN [default mode network, involving in day-dreaming and self-reflection], visual cortex, and motor network”, which the researchers linked to caffeine’s known beneficial effects on “attention, vigilance, and action/motion function.” There was little correlation locally between increased entropy and cerebral blood flow (which was reduced by caffeine), suggesting the effects of the caffeine were via influences on neuronal function, rather than due to vascular changes.

“Increased resting brain entropy indicates increased resting brain activity irregularity or complexity, suggesting an increase of information processing capacity in the resting brain,” the researchers said.

Meanwhile, a separate group led by Glenn Saxe at New York University’s School of Medicine used the same methods as Chang’s team to measure brain entropy in 900 healthy participants, who also completed measures of their verbal intelligence and reasoning ability outside of the scanner. The New York researchers defined brain entropy as “a measure of the brain’s overall flexibility or readiness to encounter unpredictable stimuli” and they found that it correlated with intelligence.

Specifically, superior vocabulary performance was associated with greater resting-state entropy in the left inferior frontal lobe, while superior reasoning ability was associated with greater entropy in that same region, but also in bilateral prefrontal areas.

Saxe and his colleagues said that “entropy in this context provides an indicator of the brain’s general readiness to process unpredictable stimuli from the environment” – a brain with greater entropy may in effect be better able to model and predict the outcomes of a complex, chaotic world. The researchers added, though, that they had not measured “the active use of brain states during a particular task”. Indeed, follow up research is now needed to see how brain entropy varies during performance of specific mental challenges, and how caffeine and other substances might affect entropy during such tasks.

In contrast to the entropy–intelligence association, participants’ age and years of education did not correlate with their IQ test scores. “These results suggest that entropy is a reliable predictor of intelligence, and provides unique information not captured by developmental status and educational status alone,” the researchers said.

The new findings add to past research measuring neural entropy that’s shown entropy is reduced in adults diagnosed with ADHD, for example, and in people addicted to cocaine. However, the story is not as simple as more entropy is good, less is bad. For instance, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia have greater neural entropy than healthy controls, perhaps indicative of “an underlying dysregulation of more complex functional networks”.

It will be interesting to see how the research on neural entropy develops in the future. For now, it is enough to marvel that as you enjoy your morning coffee, you are increasing the entropy throughout your brain – the bitter tonic is not merely waking you up, but apparently also boosting your brain’s useful anarchy, its complexity and information processing capacity.

—Caffeine Caused a Widespread Increase of Resting Brain Entropy

—Brain entropy and human intelligence: A resting-state fMRI study

Christian Jarrett (@Psych_Writer) is Editor of BPS Research Digest

https://digest.bps.org.uk/2018/04/10/ca ... ood-thing/
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Re: Coffee

Post: # 192742Unread post Gary Oak »

This is very bad news ! Those who drink six or more cups of coffee a day have an increased risk of developing dementia by 53% ! Fortunately my coffee consumption in the last few years has gone below six cups but this still is not good news. Apparently coffee shrinks the brain which can’t be healthy. This addiction is very painful to quit. https://justthenews.com/nation/science/ ... your-brain

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