Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 58648Unread post Blue Frost »

Anyone with half a mind know going in that place wouldn't change the barbaric stone age mentality.



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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59178Unread post Gary Oak »

http://thecommonsenseshow.com/2013/09/1 ... he-planet/

It is interesting that during a speech at Georgetown University Obama had the name Jesus covered up. Obama wants American forces aiding Al Qaida and the muslim brotherhood in Syria which I believe not coincidentally brutally crushing the Christians there as they have been all over the middle east.

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59184Unread post Blue Frost »

Obama is no Christian as many believe, He is either an Atheist, or Muslim in my opinion.

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59185Unread post Gary Oak »

I am quite certain that he is a very high degree satanist

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59188Unread post Blue Frost »

I call him a money grabbing pan socialist wiener

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59203Unread post Blue Frost »

Does Obama want a new caliphate in the Middle East?
http://alerts.michaelsavage.com/HS?a=EN ... _HhdAFRFPr
Welcome to The Michael Savage Newsletter, your daily insider report on all things "Savage."

In today's issue: The Washington Post is now reporting that the CIA is arming Syrian rebels.

"Why are we arming al-Qaida?" asked a furious Michael Savage, adding that he was beginning to suspect that many members of Obama's inner circle are "working for the other side."


"Will Obama bomb Syria no matter what? I think he will," Savage said to his audience, adding:

We have a novice in the White House, which has been clear to me from the beginning.

He's a front man for various and sundry forces.

Meanwhile, U.S. weapons are being sent to Syrian rebels by your friends at the CIA.

This just came out of the Washington Post.

Why are we arming al-Qaida?

This is all starting to look like the TV show "Homeland."

I'm not asking you which member of Obama's inner circle is a double agent.

I'm asking you which one isn't.

What does Obama want? A new caliphate in the Middle East?

Some would say yes.

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59426Unread post Gary Oak »

The name Arab Spring makes it sound like they are like a breath of fresh air, they are bringing paradise everywhere they go......not


Islamists Tell Egyptian Christians 'Convert, Go Broke, Or Die'

http://mnnonline.org

Egypt is still upside-down and sideways. Nearly a month after a state of emergency was declared, the interim government extended the order by two months.

This action gives security forces greater powers of arrest. In mid-August, authorities and protestors clashed violently over the ouster of President, Mohamed Morsi.

That led to a backlash of violence that claimed nearly 1,000 lives in the days that followed, with Christians targeted as the scapegoat. Open Doors CEO David Curry says, "Some of these extremist groups think that Christianity itself, the very existence of it, is problematic, so they're trying to snuff it out. So there's a confluence of events which is making it very, very dangerous to be a follower of Jesus in Egypt."

Ever since, a night-time curfew has also been in effect in much of the country.

With that in place, how did Islamists managed the takeover of a Christian village in the south? Police can't be everywhere and can't protect everyone, Curry says.

The lack of protection is especially dangerous for the residents in Dalga, which was taken over by hardliners a couple of weeks ago. "There are about 20,000 believers that have an enclave there (in Dalga), and they gather together and they go to church. They want to worship in freedom."

What's more, since the siege began, word has leaked out that the Muslim Brotherhood has demanded that the Christians recant, pay a "jizya," or suffer the consequences. Curry explains, "They're literally being taxed until and unless they convert to Islam. So there's a tax levied.

If you don't pay the tax, you're going to be attacked, you're going to be punished, and your property is going to be attacked."

The "jizya" is a kind of tax that Islamic law requires religious minorities to pay Muslims. The amounts demanded are ruinous. "We're talking about real money in terms of the Egyptian lifestyle. It may be that a person is made to choose between holding on to their faith and being martyred for their faith."

Already, Muslims in southern Egypt have killed two Christian men for failing to pay it.

The Voice of the Martyrs reports that a Muslim man demanded a Christian in a village in Assiut pay him nearly $1,500. They've also forced at least 140 Coptic Christians to pay 200 Egyptian pounds daily (US $30). When you consider that roughly 40% of Egyptians live on less than $2 USD a day, there aren't many who can remain in their hometown safely. Forty Coptic Christian families have left as a result of the tax.

Still, Curry says there have been reports of people coming to Christ. He explains, "The Christian faith is vibrant, and it's going to find its fruition because people are seeking answers, and they're not looking for political answers." Additionally, the followers of Christ have something that piques curiosity in times like these. "When people are introduced to Jesus, there's peace. There's life there. That's what we want for them.

Certainly, there are still great things happening even in the midst of this difficulty and in this persecution."

Their partners are careful when they respond to needs in the area. "Open Doors is asking everybody to pray for Egypt, to support the believers there. We're on the ground trying to help these churches. We're rebuilding churches. We're trying to help pastors." Curry says you can help, too.

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59430Unread post Blue Frost »

http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/world/2013/S ... Jizya-Tax/

Muslims in southern Egypt killed two Christian men for failing to pay them protection money.

Muslims in the area are demanding Christians pay them "jizya," a kind of tax that Islamic law requires religious minorities to pay Muslims.

However, the tax is so high many Christians simply can't afford it.

The Voice of the Martyrs reports that a Muslim man demanded a Christian in a village in Assiut pay him nearly $1,500.

The Christian sought help from local police but to no avail.

When he failed to come up with the money, several Muslims went to his home and shot him and his cousin to death.

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Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Sudan

Post: # 59625Unread post Gary Oak »

http://atlasshrugs2000.typepad.com/atla ... haria.html

Izlam sure is the same evil everywhere.

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59628Unread post Blue Frost »

Sad, but I see the only way of fighting them is to just go on an all out war with them.
If was lived there I would just start a gorilla war on them all, and making it look like the other side was doing it making it Muslim against Muslim.

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59636Unread post Gary Oak »

The Chinese new how to deal with them. They denutted the men that they didn't kill. It worked. Milesoc also had a similar successful method as did the Spanish in 1492. Nothing else appears to work with these muslim morons

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 59645Unread post Blue Frost »

JJ Pershing did in the Philippines, but today he would be hated, and jailed.
he lined them up, shot them, pored pigs blood on them, and let one guy go free to tell his friends.

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Muslim Terror Groups Killing Christians Everywhere As Usual

Post: # 60109Unread post Gary Oak »

Oh look, what a surprise....evil muslims being evil everywhere ......as usual

Islamic Terror Groups Are Killing Christians All Over The World

http://endoftheamericandream.com

Over the past couple of days, we have witnessed some absolutely horrific examples of Islamic terror groups specifically targeting Christians and those from other non-Muslim religions.

Sadly, this is not a new phenomenon. Radical Islamic jihadists are constantly attacking churches and slaughtering Christians all over the planet. The recent events in Pakistan, Kenya and Egypt may have taken this persecution to a new level, but this is just the continuation of a trend that has been building for years.

Unfortunately, Barack Obama does not seem too concerned about Islamic terrorism. In fact, he specifically directed that

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 60111Unread post Blue Frost »

Image

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Killing Christians Is the Way to Martyrdom

Post: # 61705Unread post Gary Oak »

Everybody knows that letting that nobody wants these evil people to immigrate to their countries yet our governments keep insisting on granting them their dream of coming to the west and enjoying the benefits of living here while the plot out destruction.


Killing Christians Is the Way to Martyrdom - The Shocking Message Being Taught in Pakistan's Schools

http://www.christianpost.com

Some school textbooks in Pakistan include lessons teaching students that killing Christians is a goal that must be achieved for them to obtain martyrdom, according to a report prepared by the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI).

The report also included claims that Islamist groups in Pakistan are launching regular attacks against non-Muslim Pakistanis as well as some sects of Muslims such as Shiites and Ahmadi, whom they do not consider to be real Muslims.

The report states that official and independent media, government leaders and religious scholars have legitimized hate against religious minorities, with the term "minority" itself having come to be seen in a pejorative context.

"As a result of such legitimization of hate through school textbooks, government policies, sermons in mosques and religious congregations, there is growing persecution of Pakistani Christians, Hindus, Shias and Ahmadi Muslims," the report read.

"Jihad is part of our faith. We will not back down [from our decision]," Shah Farman, an official with a regional political faction, told World Net Daily.

The report added that many textbooks in Pakistan feed the Islamic trend and promote hatred and jihad among primary school students. Shockingly non-Muslim Pakistanis also have to go through the same school texts on a daily basis from a young age.

"Throughout Pakistan's history, since its creation in 1947, hate speech against non-Muslims has been a normal phenomenon in Pakistani society," the report noted.

There were also other claims that revealed school children were being forced to convert to Islam while in school, extending the picture of persecution taking place in the south-Asian country.

The Archbishop of Karachi and the head of the Council of Pakistani Bishops revealed that Christians in the country are under constant pressure to convert to Islam, most notably in schools at a young age.

"The daily lives of religious minorities in Pakistan are characterized by poverty, injustice and discrimination. Non-Muslims are identified as second-class citizens in school textbooks. Teachers repeatedly ask students to write essays titled: write a letter to your friend encouraging him to convert to Islam," Bishop Joseph Coats told the Italian AKI agency.

Read more at http://www.prophecynewswatch.com/2013/O ... C9QH33z.99

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 61708Unread post Blue Frost »

Today is the anniversary of the battle of Tours, A Christian army lead by one of my ancestors kicked Islam out of France saving the west.
It would have been nice if more would celebrate today

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Egypt's Christians Close Ranks As Kidnappings Spike

Post: # 65405Unread post Gary Oak »

Ishmael the bible describes as being " a wild ass of a man" so it is no wonder that his descendants are also. Look at what these pious muslims are doing. Are these the kind of people we want in our western nations ?


Egypt's Christians Close Ranks As Kidnappings Spike

http://ca.news.yahoo.com
Hany Sedhom's story begins the way dozens of others begin: it was dark, and he was driving home to a village on the outskirts of this sleepy city in late September.

Suddenly a car and motorcycle emerged out of the night, blocking the road. The men quickly got out and pointed automatic rifles at his head. Mr. Sedhom considered stepping on the gas and trying to escape, but he quickly abandoned the thought when the men fired at his car. They dragged him out of the vehicle, striking his head with a rifle butt and slashing his face with a knife before tying his hands, blindfolding him, and driving off into the desert with him.

Over the next 48 hours, Mr. Sedhom was beaten, taunted, and threatened with death. He was given no food, and only filthy water to drink.

He was finally released after his wife paid a ransom of 300,000 Egyptian pounds (about $43,500)

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 65406Unread post Blue Frost »

And liberal Libtards couldn't care less

The BBC

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Re: Christianity 'Close To Extinction' In Middle East

Post: # 65409Unread post Blue Frost »

Christians in Middle East "face extinction" because of jihad terror
http://www.jihadwatch.org/2013/11/chris ... error.html

The mainstream media habitually runs interference for jihadists, obfuscating their identity and goals, and under-reporting the atrocities they commit. This article is a particularly egregious example. "Christians 'face extinction' amid sectarian terror, minister warns," by Matthew Holehouse for the Telegraph, November 14 (thanks to Anne Crockett):

Christianity is in danger of becoming extinct in its ancient homelands because of a rising tide of sectarian attacks, a senior minister will warn on Friday.

"Sectarian," eh? So some other sect is attacking Christianity? What sect could it be? Scientology? Eckankar? Followers of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh?

Violence against Christian worshippers and other religious minorities by fanatics has become a

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More Islamic Murders

Post: # 65932Unread post Gary Oak »

More of what we all know about the evil of Izlam

Age Of Intolerance: The War On Christians

http://www.theage.com.au
As Christian villager Asia Bibi languished in a Pakistani jail awaiting death by hanging for drinking water from a Muslim cup, two suicide bombers killed 85 worshippers in a Peshawar church.

For Egypt's Copts, who risk having the small cross-tattoos many wear on their wrists burnt off with acid by militant Muslims, the Arab Spring has been wintry. In August it got worse: Muslim Brotherhood supporters, blaming them for the army's removal of president Mohamed Mursi, attacked more than 100 Christian sites - 42 churches were razed.

In Somalia, al-Shabab, which slaughtered scores of people at a Kenyan shopping mall in September, has reportedly vowed to kill every Somali Christian.

For Egypt's Copts, who risk having the small cross-tattoos many wear on their wrists burnt off with acid by militant Muslims, the Arab Spring has been wintry. Photo: Nasser Nasser

In northern Nigeria, Boko Haram has butchered thousands of Christians, as well as Muslims they consider inadequately ideological - such as those seeking an education.

Four of every five acts of religious discrimination in the world today are directed against Christians, according to the Germany-based International Society for Human Rights. The secular US think tank the Pew Forum says Christians face harassment or oppression in 139 nations, nearly three-quarters of all the countries on earth.

It is not just Muslims, who themselves often face horrendous persecution, who attack Christians. In the Indian state of Orissa, Hindu nationalists attacked Christians in a vicious pogrom in 2008, killing 500, injuring thousands with machetes, and leaving 50,000 homeless. A nun was raped and paraded naked through the streets, watched by police who arrested no one.

In Burma, Bhutan, Nepal and Sri Lanka, Buddhist militants have murdered Christians, Muslims and Hindus. In 2010 the Burmese military attacked Christian minorities from helicopters, reportedly killing thousands.

These cases are horrific, certainly, but surely they are disconnected and accidental acts of cruelty and violence? Not so, rights observers say: they are all part of the biggest human rights challenge now facing the globe - religious intolerance - and also part of a largely unobserved global war on Christians. Things may be worse now for more Christians than at any time in history, including under the Roman Empire.

''War'' does not mean a unified campaign directed by a single co-ordinating mind. But it is no exaggeration, Vatican analyst John Allen argues in his new book, The Global War on Christians, because it represents a ''massive, worldwide pattern of violence and oppression directed against a specific group of people, often explicitly understood by its perpetrators as part of a broader cultural and spiritual struggle''. If we are not honest enough to call it a war, we will not face it with the necessary urgency, he says.

What is happening? Why are Christians especially at risk, and why are Western governments, media and churches so reluctant to acknowledge it, let alone act? And, as some observers suggest, is religious persecution heading back to the West?

Religion is often only one factor in this violence, part of a combustible cocktail of racial, ethnic, economic and linguistic motives, but increasingly - such as with the rising tide of puritanical Muslim Salafists - it is the main or only reason. And in the countries where the problem is most severe, persecution has accelerated and deepened in the past two years.

The international Catholic charity Aid to the Church in Need last week launched its 191-page report Persecuted and Forgotten, challenging the international community's willingness to stand up for religious freedom.

The report calls the flight of Christians from the Middle East an exodus of almost biblical proportions. ''Incidents of persecution are now apparently relentless and worsening: churches being burnt, Christians under pressure to convert, mob violence against Christian homes, abduction and rape of Christian girls, anti-Christian propaganda in the media and from government, discrimination in schools and the workplace.''

Long-time religious liberty analyst and advocate Liz Kendal says when she began monitoring religious violence 15 years ago, ''I was reporting on an attack here or there, usually a militant who came in and attacked a missionary. Now it's pogroms where people massacre their neighbours with machetes and with impunity''. Kendal is the Melbourne-based advocacy director of Christian Faith and Freedom.

This is a frightening new feature, that neighbours join or lead the brutality. ''One of the disturbing things about Syria is not just all the al-Qaeda-linked groups, but that local Muslims welcome them. They want their Christian neighbours to leave,'' Kendal says.

Persecution can be a nebulous term. Both Christians and Muslims in the West have used it to refer to non-life-threatening discrimination. American scholar Charles Tieszen's definition is a good one: any unjust action of mild to intense levels of hostility, directed at people belonging to a religion resulting in varying levels of harm, in which the victim's religious identification is the main motive.

Todd Johnson, of Gordon Conwell's Centre for the Study of Global Christianity, estimates 70 million Christians have died for their faith, 45 million of them in the 20th century.

John Allen notes that ''this boom in religious violence is still very much a growth industry. Christians today are by some order of magnitude the most persecuted religious body on the planet,'' suffering not just martyrdom but all forms of intimidation and oppression in record numbers.

The US Commission on International Religious Freedom, which monitors religious persecution and names the worst offenders in an annual report, listed 16 nations guilty of ''heinous and systematic'' offences in its 2012 report.

Only one group is under attack in all 16 nations: Christians. (The countries are Burma, China, Egypt, Eritrea, Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, North Korea, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam.)

Open Doors lists 25 countries as most hazardous, 18 of them Muslim-majority nations - six in Asia, seven in Africa, eight in the Middle East, and four in the former Soviet empire. As Allen notes, this shows that it really is a global war.

The Middle East, the birthplace of Christianity, may soon be emptied of its adherents, and of other religious minorities. In Iraq, which had 1.5 million Christians before the first Gulf War, the total is now possibly as little as a 10th of that. Most have fled, but unnumbered thousands have been killed.

Muslims also suffer greatly - in Buddhist Burma and Thailand, in Hindu India and communist China, and in Muslim countries where their particular form is a minority. Hindus are persecuted in Buddhist countries, such as Sri Lanka. Iranian authorities, brutal against Christians, are even more vicious when it comes to Baha'is. Persecution seems an equal-opportunity affair.

Nor are Christians immune from perpetrating violence, as the world has seen in Rwanda, the Congo and Yugoslavia in the past 20 years. Yet when it comes to victims, they are well out in front. Why?

World Evangelical Alliance spokesman Thomas Schirrmacher says a number of factors combine. Christianity is much the biggest religion, so its numbers are likely to be large, and it is experiencing enormous growth in dangerous places where it makes established groups feel threatened.

Religious nationalists tend to identify Christianity with Western colonialism. Christians, supported by better international networks, also tend to be more outspoken in advocating rights and democracy and in opposing corruption.

Dictators fear that Christians do not give them the undivided allegiance they demand (think North Korea, China or Vietnam), while some commentators even suggest Christians help bring suffering on themselves because of their willingness to turn the other cheek - militant Muslims might be more wary if they didn't have impunity, if Christians too adopted suicide bombing.

Why, 1700 years after the Edict of Milan, in which Constantine decreed religious tolerance in the Roman Empire, is religious intolerance so savage?

A number of cross currents have come together, including rising religious nationalism, Islamic fundamentalism driven particularly by Saudi Arabia's petrodollars, victory for Islamists against Russia in Afghanistan, which sent the jihadis back to their various homes with ambitions entrenched, and the loss of American political influence after the global financial crisis.

This has been encouraged by a shameful apathy or denial by First World leaders. When it comes to secular politics, the victims are too Christian to matter much to the left, who are much more comfortable bashing the doubtless legitimate but comparatively minor target of Israel. And they are too brown or too foreign to matter much to most on the right.

Secularists also tend to think of Christians as the oppressor, not the oppressed. When they picture persecution, they turn to history: the crusades, the Inquisition, Europe's savage 17th century religious wars, and colonial exploitation.

But, as John Allen observes: ''Today we do not live on the pages of a Dan Brown potboiler, in which Christians are dispatching mad assassins to settle historical scores. Instead, they're the ones fleeing assassins others have dispatched.''

He also cites two sets of ''blinders''. Christians in the West can overstate the struggles they face from an increasingly post-Christian state, which diminishes sympathy for the Christians in real danger. Second, Western powerbrokers tend to underestimate the role religion plays in persecution in the Third World, its consistency as a driver.

Liz Kendal says there was a brief period when the US made a difference through its religious freedom bill. Introduced in 1998, it worked well for a decade, but collapsed with the global financial crisis in 2008 when the US economic clout ''evaporated overnight and religious liberty was affected immediately, especially in China and Iran'', she says.

''Now the gloves are off. Persecution with impunity is the order of the day and no one can stop it. America could threaten sanctions, and things would settle down, but those days are over. ''

Kendal is scathing about Western churches, saying they often deliberately avert their eyes. ''The Western church is so happy having a nice time in celebratory worship, they don't want the burden of this knowledge (of what is happening to their brethren). Pastors feel under pressure to have their congregations leave the church feeling upbeat.''

She says the churches have to stop expecting political solutions. ''The cavalry is not going to come over the hill, and it's not where the church's faith should be anyway.''

Her pessimism runs deep. Not only is religious persecution unstoppable in Islamic and other Third World countries, but it is on the way in the West, if in a different form, she says.

Where Christian social conservatism was once mainstream, she predicts Christians will face jail and other sanctions if they do not toe the fast-changing secular line on such issues as condoning homosexuality and same-sex marriage.

Cardinal Francis George, the Catholic Archbishop of Chicago, made a similar prediction, noting in 2010: ''I expect to die in bed, my successor will die in prison, and his successor will die a martyr in the public square.''

And why does mainstream Western media miss the big picture? ''That's the million-dollar question, and I don't know,'' Kendal replies. She suggests it is a combination of ignorance by journalists about the historical and political context of persecution and a political correctness that will not allow them to criticise Muslims for fear of being labelled racist or Islamophobic. ''It's just too hot to handle,'' she says.

''Turn on your TV and there is a young BBC reporter in Syria saying 'these freedom fighters are fighting for democracy'. And behind him are bushy-bearded jihadists waving a black flag and shouting 'Allahu akbar' [God is great], fresh from cutting throats.''

In Burma, Kendal says, Western journalists believe the regime's talk of reform and don't realise Aung San Suu Kyi has been silenced, or the religious hatred that is directed against ethnic minorities. In Sudan, the Islamic regime is running a declared jihad against the African Christians, who are sitting on the last of the country's oil. ''It's genocide taking place before our eyes, and we're not talking about it.''

Paul Marshall, author of Blind Spot - When Journalists Don't Get Religion, thinks another factor is that so few journalists are Christian. Thus they tend to think that religion doesn't have any intellectual content, it is merely feelings and emotion, so it's not worth the effort to learn about it.

Marshall, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute for Religious Freedom in Washington, says the churches, in turn, are not very good at talking to journalists. It's easy, too, to overlook that opponents such as Osama bin Laden have had a coherent, intelligent view of the world, even if we disagree with it.

Meanwhile suffering Christians might find scant consolation in the knowledge they were warned - Jesus says, in the Gospel of John: ''In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.''

Read more at http://www.prophecynewswatch.com/2013/N ... OPbEoWB.99

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