Healthy Foods/Medical

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Healthy Foods/Medical

Post: # 59922Unread post Gary Oak »

http://www.naturalblaze.com/2013/09/10- ... cados.html

Here are ten reasons to eat Avocados


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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 59927Unread post Blue Frost »

I don't like them, Broccoli either.

You might find more stuff here :) http://www.bluefrost.org/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=12
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Guava's are a Superfood

Post: # 69148Unread post Gary Oak »

I believe that I should pick up some Guavas. Hope Monsanto doesn't start modifying these trees.

http://preventdisease.com/news/13/12131 ... food.shtml

Dec 13, 2013 by KAREN FOSTER
Why Guavas Should Be Considered A Superfood

Guavas have the highest concentration of antioxidants that protect against cell damage which ages skin and can cause cancer. This inexpensive and humble food should be regarded as one of the top 'superfoods' nature has blessed us with.


Guavas are rich in dietary fiber, vitamins A and C, folic acid, and the dietary minerals, potassium, copper and manganese. Having a generally broad, low-calorie profile of essential nutrients, a single common guava fruit contains about four times the amount of vitamin C as an orange.

A series of tests published in the Food Research International Journal found that among fruits found in India, including Himalayan apples and pomegranates, bananas and grapes, that the guava, the poor man's fruit in India, has the highest concentration of antioxidants as compared to all the other fruits.

The study found that while there is a presence of antioxidant concentrations of just under 500 milligrams per 100 grams in guavas, 330mg in plums and 135mg in pomegranates, apples have a quarter of the antioxidants in guavas and bananas merely have a tiny fraction with 30 mg per 100 grams.

Guavas are beneficial in regulating blood pressure. One guava contains almost a similar amount of potassium that's present in bananas. Potassium reverses the effects of sodium, thereby regulating the balance of blood pressure.

Consumption of guavas helps slow down the absorption of sugar in the blood. It is rich in fibre and is helpful for diabetics. Also, studies have shown that a diet that is high in fibre (5.4 gm per 100 gm of fruit) is linked to a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Individuals suffering from constipation problems, too, can benefit form the high fibre content.

Did you know that guavas contain four times more Vitamin C than oranges? Vitamin C contains antioxidant properties that protect cells from the damage of free radicals and is useful in lowering the risk of cancer.

Even though guavas don't contain iodine, they are still beneficial in promoting healthy thyroid function, because it contains copper, which aids the production and absorption of hormones.

Guavas are a good source of manganese that acts as an enzyme activator utilising nutrients like thiamine, biotin and ascorbic acid.

If you want to optimise your brian function, turn to this fruit. Guavas are rich in the B group of vitamins. Niacin, better known as Vitamin B3, promotes blood circulation, thereby stimulating brain function. Vitamin B6, that is pyridoxine, helps in brain and nerve function.

Women with fertility problems can eat guavas as they contain a good amounts of folate, which contain fertility-promoting properties.

Eye problems can be kept at bay as guavas contain an abundance of Vitamin A that helps in improving vision.

Guava is good for the skin, too. Because of its Vitamin E content, astringent properties and antioxidants, the skin is nourished. Skin ailments like scurvy can be dealt with due to the high Vitamin C content in guavas.

Pink guavas are said to contain twice the amount of lycopene present in tomatoes. Lycopene protects the skin from being damaged by UV rays and also works against prostate cancer.

Even the leaves of guava have medicinal properties. The juice of the leaves is said to provide relief from cold and cough by reducing the formation of mucus, disinfecting the respiratory tract and preventing bacterial activity in the throat due to its astringent properties.

Guavas are sold in varying degrees of ripeness. However, it's best to quickly eat them within two days of getting ripe.

Foliage diseases, such as anthracnose, can be a problem in humid climates where guava is grown. They are regularly controlled with fungicide applications so it is important for the consumer to access organic varities that use natural methods to control pests.

Karen Foster is a holistic nutritionist, avid blogger, with five kids and an active lifestyle that keeps her in pursuit of the healthiest path towards a life of balance.

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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 69149Unread post Blue Frost »

Look for some Mangosteen, Dragon, and Star fruit while getting some :) very healthy fruits.
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How To Make Turmeric Juice

Post: # 87816Unread post Gary Oak »

http://healthydebates.com/make-turmeric ... -beverage/

(Natural Cures) Turmeric is known to be one of the most powerful healing herbs. It is great for bones and joints as it has anti-inflammatory properties. It prevents metastases from occurring in many different forms of cancer.

Turmeric
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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 87818Unread post Blue Frost »

I read that recipe before, it was for a Cold :) It might not beat it, but will help one.
It helps build up the immunity.
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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 130673Unread post Gary Oak »

I intend to eat more bananas now. My heart was pounding a bit too hard at work a couple of weeks ago so I started jogging. Eating magnesium rich foods like bananas seems like a good idea to me.

The Higher The Magnesium Level, The Healthier Our Arteries

http://www.naturalblaze.com/2016/03/the ... eries.html

By Mae Chan

Higher serum levels of magnesium may reduce the risk of hypertension by almost 50% and the risk of coronary artery calcification by 42%, says a new study.

More than 70 percent of the population have an unhealthy balance of 10 calcium to 1 magnesium in our many trillions of cells. A previous study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicated that for every 50 mg per day increase in intake of the mineral, the risk of cancer was modestly reduced by 7%.

Another notable study of more than 4,600 Americans, begun in 1985, found the risk of developing metabolic syndrome over the next 15 years was 31 percent lower for those with the highest intake of magnesium.

Data from 1,276 Mexican-mestizo subjects also indicated that for every 0.17 mg/dL increase in serum magnesium level was associated with a 16% reduction in coronary artery calcification.

While the data indicates correlation and not causation, scientists from the National Institute of Cardiology – Ignacio ChÃvez in Mexico City said that there is biological plausibility for the potential cardiovascular benefits, adding that the mechanism(s) may be linked to enhancing endothelial function and reducing inflammation.


One study, which combined data from 313,041 people, provides the “most robust evidence to date of the associations between circulating and dietary magnesium across their usual physiologic ranges and CVD risk”, wrote Dr Dariush Mozaffarian and his co-authors in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Benefits

The results add to an ever growing body of science supporting the potential health benefits of the mineral. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) lists magnesium as being necessary for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body, from helping maintain normal muscle and nerve function, to keeping heart rhythm steady, supporting a healthy immune system, and keeping bones strong. The mineral is also needed for blood sugar management, and healthy blood pressure.

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has issued positive opinions on magnesium and the maintenance of normal bone, teeth, and protein synthesis; the reduction of tiredness and fatigue; electrolyte balance; normal energy-yielding metabolism; neurotransmission, and muscle contraction.

However, EFSA was not convinced by claims about magnesium and blood glucose, blood pressure, stress relief, protection of DNA, proteins and lipids from oxidative damage, the immune system and fat metabolism.

Study details

The new cross-sectional study, which was published in the Nutrition Journal , assessed magnesium levels in almost 1,300 Mexican participants aged between 30 and 75. None of the participants had any symptoms of cardiovascular disease.

The results indicated that people with the highest average serum levels magnesium (greater than 2.18 mg/dl) had 48% lower odds of high blood pressure (hypertension), 69 % lower odds of type 2 diabetes, and 42% lower odds of coronary artery calcification, compared with people with lowest average levels (less than 1.97 mg/dl).

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“The results of this study strongly suggest that lower serum magnesium levels are associated with coronary artery calcification in Mexican subjects free of clinically apparent cardiovascular disease,” wrote the researchers. “Confirmation of these results in other populations is required. Additional prospective studies are also needed to determine if hypomagnesaemia predicts the development and progression of coronary atherosclerosis.”
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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 130675Unread post Blue Frost »

I'm taking Magnesium, and eat bananas every day. Supposedly two bananas a day is good for blood pressure, but I eat one.
I take Magnesium Malate, it's suppose to be a better form than the Oxide type that is pushed, and so easy to get.
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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 130678Unread post Gary Oak »

There's more reasons that I didn't know to eat bananas Next time I go groceriy shopping I will pick some up.
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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 130679Unread post Gary Oak »

High Blood Pressure Diet & Natural Remedies

http://draxe.com/high-blood-pressure-diet/

Are you one of the millions of people unknowingly living with high blood pressure? You’re not alone. About one in every three American adults deals with the condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (1) The good news is a high blood pressure diagnosis doesn’t mean you’re destined for a life of prescription medications. It’s relatively easy to lower blood pressure naturally, especially by improving your diet in order follow a high blood pressure diet.

If you’ve been diagnosed with high blood pressure or you’re just hoping to prevent it from developing in the future, a high blood pressure diet is one of the most important things to address. A healthy diet is the key natural remedy for high blood pressure, especially since it’s completely safe, simple and works fast to improve your overall health beyond just your blood pressure.
The High Blood Pressure Diet: How to Improve Your Diet to Lower High Blood Pressure

Research shows that about 50 percent of people with high blood pressure fail to control their condition, either because they aren’t aware of the problem or they haven’t made lifestyle changes that promote overall heart health.

It might seem daunting to overhaul your whole life to help control your high blood pressure — for example, by taking prescriptions, eating differently, lowering stress and exercising. But you’ll be happy to learn that it’s usually surprisingly easy for many people to help tackle high blood pressure just by making some simple changes.

For example, people following a high blood pressure diet like the DASH diet over time have been able to lower their systolic blood pressure by seven to 12 points, a significant amount that can make a big difference. This can be accomplished in stages through very approachable steps, such as eating more fresh produce and cooking more often.

Some of the best foods that lower blood pressure naturally include:

1. Vegetables

Eating a variety of vegetables is a staple for basically every diet that exists, considering veggies are high-antioxidant foods packed with protective nutrients like fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K and various electrolytes (yet very low in calories). A report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that people who ate a mostly plant-based diet reported lower blood pressure readings than meat eaters who were likely to consume less fresh produce. (2)

Aim for at least four to five servings of different veggies every day. Ideally, include a variety so you get a range of nutrients (hence the saying “eat the rainbow”). Leafy greens like spinach, kale, mustard greens and turnip greens are potassium-rich foods and among the healthiest foods on earth, and all hardly add any calories to your diet.

2. Fresh Fruit

Consuming fresh fruit (as opposed to juices or sweetened, canned fruits) is a great way to increase your intake of fiber, electrolytes like potassium and magnesium, and antioxidants like flavonoids and resveratrol. (3) Two to four servings is a good amount for most people, especially fruits like berries, citrus, kiwi, apples and melon.

3. Lean Proteins

This can include foods such as wild-caught seafood (especially anti-inflammatory omega-3 foods like salmon, sardines and halibut), cage-free eggs and grass-fed/pasture-raised meats. Aim to get about 20 percent to 30 percent of your total calories from “lean and clean” proteins. This type of protein is important to maintain your energy levels. These foods also make you feel full, balance your blood sugar and help maintain muscle strength.

4. Beans and Legumes

Beans and legumes — lentils, chickpeas, black beans and adzuki beans — are great sources to increase your intake of fiber, protein, B vitamins and certain antioxidants. They’re suitable for people who don’t consume meat or animal products, low in calories, plus almost completely free of sodium (when you make them from scratch or rinse the canned kinds well).

A helpful tip for making beans even healthier and digestible is to first soak them overnight before cooking, which helps release antinutrients that block mineral absorption and interfere with digestive processes. Try to consume beans/legumes several times per week as a good meat alternative.

5. Healthy Fats

Nuts and seeds are a potent source of healthy fats, and they also add some protein and fiber to your diet, too. Aside from seeds and nuts, other beneficial anti-inflammatory foods that are packed with healthy fats include avocados, coconut oil and extra virgin olive oil. These fats help stabilize blood sugar levels, a perk that helps keep you full and less likely to overeat.

Most people should get about 25 percent to 35 percent of their daily calories from healthy fats. If you’re dealing with high cholesterol and high blood pressure, try lowering your intake of saturated fats from animal foods and butter and oils like palm oil to help prevent cardiovascular complications, although in moderation these can still be healthy for most people. (4)

6. 100 Percent Whole Grains (Ideally Sprouted)

Whole grains are emphasized on the DASH diet and other high blood pressure diet plans mostly because they’re a good source of fiber and certain minerals known to lower blood pressure, especially compared to refined carbohydrates. (5) Examples of whole grains to eat in moderation (some of which are called “ancient grains” and are actually more like seeds than grains) include brown rice, amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, barley, farro, wheat berries, teff and millet.

The DASH diet recommends up to six to eight servings of whole grains daily, but my opinion is to emphasize things like fresh produce, lean proteins and healthy fats even more, considering their nutrient density. When you do eat grains, try to focus mostly on gluten-free, sprouted whole grains.

7. Organic, Unsweetened Dairy Products

While the DASH diet includes low-fat or fat-free dairy products like milk and yogurt, it’s important to focus on the quality of the dairy you consume. Choosing organic, unsweetened and ideally raw dairy is the best option for most people, especially the kinds that come from goats or A2 cows.

Dairy foods like unsweetened, organic yogurt and kefir are a good source of various nutrients like calcium, protein and important probiotics, which is why they’re among the top choices of many nutritionists. Raw milk in moderation is something I recommend if it’s available to you, since it’s high in nutrients and enzymes that make dairy easier to digest.
High Blood Pressure Diet: The DASH Diet Protocol for Lowering Blood Pressure

The DASH diet (which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is most doctors’ go-to eating plan for lowering high blood pressure naturally. The DASH diet was first created by researchers sponsored by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The agency wanted to help people control their weight and blood pressure through diet. This includes eating a variety of easy-to-find healthy foods while reducing intake of empty calories, high-sodium foods, added sugar, refined grains and unhealthy fats. (6)

In January 2016, U.S. News & World Report named the DASH diet “the best diet” for the sixth year in a row. (7) In addition to lowering high blood pressure, the DASH diet also aids in weight loss, lowering cholesterol, and preventing or controlling diabetes. The goal of the DASH eating plan involves increasing the public’s intake of nutrients like potassium, calcium, magnesium, fiber and protein. All of these are important for maintaining general heart health and fighting various signs of aging. (8)

Food for lowering blood pressure most emphasized on the DASH diet but that should also be implemented in a high blood pressure diet include:

fresh vegetables and fruits (especially those high in potassium, which lessens the effects of sodium) (9)
low-fat dairy products (ideally organic and always unsweetened)
lean protein foods
100 percent whole grains
beans/legumes
healthy fats like olive oil, nuts, avocado and seeds

Tips for Lowering Blood Pressure

Over the years, research reveals that several habits and lifestyle changes can greatly increase your odds of preventing high blood pressure and maintaining a healthy blood pressure range. These include:

1. Cook More at Home

Cooking at home is an important part of lowering your blood pressure, which is why the creators of the DASH diet recommend it. This means keeping your diet as unprocessed as possible — consuming less things that come in packages, avoiding takeout/restaurant food and really limiting fast food. Making your own homemade meals from fresh, nutrient-dense food helps you lower your sodium and sugar intake while boosting your intake of powerful blood pressure-lowering nutrients like potassium, antioxidants and fiber.

2. Increase Fiber Consumption

Consuming plenty of fiber has been shown to help prevent hypertension, plus it can manage your appetite and avoid the blood sugar roller-coaster that results in cravings, fatigue, poor digestion and various health problems. (10) Fiber is found in nearly all unprocessed plant foods, so eating fresh vegetables not only helps in adopting a high-fiber diet, but it also aids in lowering your blood pressure. High-fiber foods also help reduce your risk of diabetes, high triglyceride levels, high cholesterol, digestive problems and weight gain.

3. Lower Your Sodium Intake

A low-sodium diet is the recommended approach to controlling high blood pressure because high amounts of sodium, found in basically all processed and packaged foods, is known to worsen high blood pressure by impacting fluid retention and how arteries dilate. (11)

Sodium is a type of electrolyte that’s balanced by other beneficial electrolytes like potassium and magnesium in order to keep blood pressure within a healthy range. The problem is that most people eating a “Standard American Diet” consume far too much sodium and far too little potassium and magnesium, leading to electrolyte imbalances.

4. Get More Potassium

A low-potassium, high-sodium diet contributes to high blood pressure, hypertension and cardiovascular disease. (12) Potassium — found in foods like green veggies, bananas, sweet potatoes, organic dairy products, beans and avocados — is the third most abundant mineral in the body and is needed to interact with sodium to perform a number of important functions.

Potassium naturally increases sodium excretion and is found within all cells, as it plays a role in regulating heartbeat rhythms, nerve impulses, muscle contractions and digestive health. Low potassium can raise fluid retention and elevate blood pressure by interfering with heart palpitations, narrowing the arteries and resulting in poor circulation.

5. Stay Hydrated

Drinking enough water each day is important for preventing dehydration, balancing fluids, beating cravings and preventing fatigue. Consume more fresh water in place of things like juice, soda, sweetened coffee and tea, making sure to have about eight eight-ounce glasses or more daily.

6. Practice Portion Control

There’s no reason to get overwhelmed and fear that you’ll never be able to eat your favorite foods again. Focus on filling up on the healthy things first, so you’re less likely to crave the unhealthy stuff. Watch your portion sizes, and practice mindful eating to make sure you give your body what it needs to feel good but not too much more that weighs you down.
High Blood Pressure Facts, Causes and Symptoms

What exactly is high blood pressure, and how do the foods you eat affect it?

High blood pressure is a condition that results from an increased force of blood moving through your arteries from your heart, which pushes against the walls of the arteries and over time can cause many problems. Every time your heart beats it pumps out blood, and the rate at which it does determines your blood pressure. It’s natural to have higher blood pressure at certain times, like when you’re stressed or exercising, but chronically high blood pressure starts to wear down arteries and increases the risk for things like coronary heart disease,stroke, heart attack, diabetes or kidney damage.

High blood pressure (considered anything over the normal level of 120/80 mmHg) is caused by a number of factors, including low nutrient intake, a poor diet high in sodium, obesity or being overweight, smoking, lack of physical activity/sedentary lifestyle, high amounts of chronic stress, other compounding medical problems and a family history of high blood pressure.

High blood pressure symptoms aren’t always present and can be hard to notice, so regular checkups are the best way to make sure you’re within a healthy range. Getting your blood pressure under control has numerous anti-aging, protective benefits, including less risk for peripheral artery diseases, protection from cardiac arrest, lower risk for a blood vessel bursting and having a stroke, protection of vision, and a lower risk for kidney damage.

Eating a nutrient-dense, low-processed diet can help bring your blood pressure closer to normal or even within a completely healthy range. You’ll start to see a difference usually within just a few short months, but consistency and ongoing effort are key.

Foods, including fresh vegetables and fruit, lean proteins and certain healthy fats, help lower inflammation and prevent nutrient deficiencies, which are two of the biggest causes for high blood pressure. (13) And a healthy high blood pressure diet is even more impactful when you make other lifestyle changes, too, like managing stress better, exercising regularly, quitting smoking and getting solid sleep.
High Blood Pressure Diet Takeaways

About one in every three American adults deals with the condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Research shows that about 50 percent of people with high blood pressure fail to control their condition, either because they aren’t aware of the problem or they haven’t made lifestyle changes that promote overall heart health.
Foods to eat on a high blood pressure diet include vegetables, fresh fruit, lean proteins, beans and legumes, healthy fats, 100 percent whole grains that are ideally sprouted, and organic, unsweetened dairy products.
The DASH diet was named the best diet for a sixth year in a row by U.S. News & World Report, and it’s an excellent high blood pressure diet. In addition to lowering high blood pressure, the DASH diet also aids in weight loss, lowering cholesterol, and preventing or controlling diabetes.
You can help lower blood pressure by cooking more at home, increasing fiber consumption, lowering your sodium intake, getting more potassium, staying hydrated and practicing portion control.

Read Next: High Blood Pressure Symptoms You Can Reverse Naturally
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Re: Healthy Foods

Post: # 130691Unread post Blue Frost »

I had some organic bananas the other day that was really nice tasting, had more flavor, and sweeter tasting.
They turned brown faster is the bad thing.

I posted something like that BP report there, and I try to follow some of it, lean meats, Salmon, healthy oils.
I lack on veggies, not many are worth eating for my taste because the store stuff is just garbage.
I have some started in my garden, but that's just seasonal food i can grow.
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