Dessert

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Renee
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Dessert

Post: # 145051Unread post Renee »

Odinson wrote: Were your grandfathers in WW2? Or in the Korean war?
I believe my Dad's father served in the British Army in N. Africa during WWII. At least that's what I've been told. After he was discharged he married and moved to the US in 1948. My other grandfather served in the US Army during WWII and took part in the invasion of Sicily and Italy. He met my grandmother there.


“A man’s rights rest in three boxes. The ballot-box, the jury-box, and the cartridge-box.”....Frederick Douglas
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Blue Frost
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Post: # 145053Unread post Blue Frost »

Odinson wrote: Were your grandfathers in WW2? Or in the Korean war?
Mine wasn't in those wars, one was in missigan building aircraft with my grandmother though for WW2.
Of course I talk to myself. Sometimes I need expert advise, and a good conversation.
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Post: # 145062Unread post Odinson »

Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Were your grandfathers in WW2? Or in the Korean war?
I believe my Dad's father served in the British Army in N. Africa during WWII. At least that's what I've been told. After he was discharged he married and moved to the US in 1948. My other grandfather served in the US Army during WWII and took part in the invasion of Sicily and Italy. He met my grandmother there.
Do you have any german relics? Like a rifle or a pistol?

You have italian ancestry and that explains why you are a pistol. :laugh:
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Post: # 145063Unread post Odinson »

Blue Frost wrote:
Odinson wrote: Were your grandfathers in WW2? Or in the Korean war?
Mine wasn't in those wars, one was in missigan building aircraft with my grandmother though for WW2.
Making weapons was as essential as fighting during those years.
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Post: # 145065Unread post Blue Frost »

I think they built B-17 Bombers, but I might be just thinking that.
My dad used to talk about it, it was when he was a little kid, he collected scrap metal to sell for the war effort. He was hurt one time when he found out someone stole it from him.
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Post: # 145066Unread post Renee »

Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Were your grandfathers in WW2? Or in the Korean war?
I believe my Dad's father served in the British Army in N. Africa during WWII. At least that's what I've been told. After he was discharged he married and moved to the US in 1948. My other grandfather served in the US Army during WWII and took part in the invasion of Sicily and Italy. He met my grandmother there.
Do you have any german relics? Like a rifle or a pistol?

You have italian ancestry and that explains why you are a pistol. :laugh:
I personally don't have any German WWII era weapons but my father has a collection of that stuff along with a bunch of Allied weapons from that era.

I do have a Yugo M59/66 SKS from the Balkan conflict. It's in really nice shape, I'd say about 90% and it has phosphorus night sights that still glow and it's more than combat accurate out to 100 yards

The 22mm grenade launcher is fun as well. It will throw dummy grenades over 100 meters. I'd like to get my hands on a case of armor piercing grenades :). I'm afraid depending which way the election goes tomorrow, I might need them. :laugh:

Just kidding.... :kez:
“A man’s rights rest in three boxes. The ballot-box, the jury-box, and the cartridge-box.”....Frederick Douglas
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Post: # 145067Unread post Blue Frost »

I have a Polish folding Ak, and some Ars and variants, nothing ww1 or 2, but would like a few like the M1, and some others.
I always wanted a Gatling gun :)
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Odinson
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Post: # 145149Unread post Odinson »

Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Were your grandfathers in WW2? Or in the Korean war?
I believe my Dad's father served in the British Army in N. Africa during WWII. At least that's what I've been told. After he was discharged he married and moved to the US in 1948. My other grandfather served in the US Army during WWII and took part in the invasion of Sicily and Italy. He met my grandmother there.
Do you have any german relics? Like a rifle or a pistol?

You have italian ancestry and that explains why you are a pistol. :laugh:
I personally don't have any German WWII era weapons but my father has a collection of that stuff along with a bunch of Allied weapons from that era.

I do have a Yugo M59/66 SKS from the Balkan conflict. It's in really nice shape, I'd say about 90% and it has phosphorus night sights that still glow and it's more than combat accurate out to 100 yards

The 22mm grenade launcher is fun as well. It will throw dummy grenades over 100 meters. I'd like to get my hands on a case of armor piercing grenades :). I'm afraid depending which way the election goes tomorrow, I might need them. :laugh:

Just kidding.... :kez:
The german WW2 weapons have a big collectors market... Also the other original german stuff.
That is in europe.

Service record plays a big part..
You got a notorious Luger that killed some jews, the price skyrockets.
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Post: # 145151Unread post Odinson »

Old west stuff would sell in Europe...

Like the version of Colt that Clint Eastwood uses in the good, the bad and the ugly.
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Post: # 145152Unread post Renee »

Odinson wrote: Old west stuff would sell in Europe...

Like the version of Colt that Clint Eastwood uses in the good, the bad and the ugly.
If I'm not mistake that was an 1851 navy, converted.

The original 1851 was cap and ball and was made famous by Wild Bill Hickok.
“A man’s rights rest in three boxes. The ballot-box, the jury-box, and the cartridge-box.”....Frederick Douglas
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Odinson
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Post: # 145153Unread post Odinson »

Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Old west stuff would sell in Europe...

Like the version of Colt that Clint Eastwood uses in the good, the bad and the ugly.
If I'm not mistake that was an 1851 navy, converted.

The original 1851 was cap and ball and was made famous by Wild Bill Hickok.
Thats what I thought after some reading.. The 1851navy colt is a percussion cap revolver..
Clint Eastwood loads cartridges in it.

Wild Bill Hickok´s revolver and General Lees personal sidearm.. Thats a dream revolver.
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Post: # 145156Unread post Blue Frost »

Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Were your grandfathers in WW2? Or in the Korean war?
I believe my Dad's father served in the British Army in N. Africa during WWII. At least that's what I've been told. After he was discharged he married and moved to the US in 1948. My other grandfather served in the US Army during WWII and took part in the invasion of Sicily and Italy. He met my grandmother there.
Do you have any german relics? Like a rifle or a pistol?

You have italian ancestry and that explains why you are a pistol. :laugh:
I personally don't have any German WWII era weapons but my father has a collection of that stuff along with a bunch of Allied weapons from that era.

I do have a Yugo M59/66 SKS from the Balkan conflict. It's in really nice shape, I'd say about 90% and it has phosphorus night sights that still glow and it's more than combat accurate out to 100 yards

The 22mm grenade launcher is fun as well. It will throw dummy grenades over 100 meters. I'd like to get my hands on a case of armor piercing grenades :). I'm afraid depending which way the election goes tomorrow, I might need them. :laugh:

Just kidding.... :kez:
The german WW2 weapons have a big collectors market... Also the other original german stuff.
That is in europe.

Service record plays a big part..
You got a notorious Luger that killed some jews, the price skyrockets.
Same here, and there is a big market for even the reproduction stuff. One company got caught making their own German serial marks on Mousers even selling them as real.
Of course I talk to myself. Sometimes I need expert advise, and a good conversation.
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Blue Frost
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Post: # 145157Unread post Blue Frost »

I have a nice lever action 44/40 a friend gave me, the gun makes you look good it's so accurate. I was shooting onions out of the air when he tossed them till the range officer stopped us. :laugh:
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Renee
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Post: # 145166Unread post Renee »

Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Old west stuff would sell in Europe...

Like the version of Colt that Clint Eastwood uses in the good, the bad and the ugly.
If I'm not mistake that was an 1851 navy, converted.

The original 1851 was cap and ball and was made famous by Wild Bill Hickok.
Thats what I thought after some reading.. The 1851navy colt is a percussion cap pistol..
Clint Eastwood loads cartridges in it.

Wild Bill Hickok´s revolver and General Lees personal sidearm.. Thats a dream revolver.
Cartridge conversions for the 1851 Navy and the 1860 Army colt were common once metallic cartridges became readily available. Problem was the metallic cartridges used in those types of revolvers were extremely anemic. The lack of top strap over the cylinder made them susceptible to blowing apart.

The 1858 Remington had s full top strap and was the revolver of choice for conversion.

It wasn't until the 1873 colt army came out (known as the peacemaker) that you could use a calibre like 38-40 or 44-40 or 45 colt safely in a colt revolver.
“A man’s rights rest in three boxes. The ballot-box, the jury-box, and the cartridge-box.”....Frederick Douglas
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Odinson
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Post: # 145211Unread post Odinson »

Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Old west stuff would sell in Europe...

Like the version of Colt that Clint Eastwood uses in the good, the bad and the ugly.
If I'm not mistake that was an 1851 navy, converted.

The original 1851 was cap and ball and was made famous by Wild Bill Hickok.
Thats what I thought after some reading.. The 1851navy colt is a percussion cap pistol..
Clint Eastwood loads cartridges in it.

Wild Bill Hickok´s revolver and General Lees personal sidearm.. Thats a dream revolver.
Cartridge conversions for the 1851 Navy and the 1860 Army colt were common once metallic cartridges became readily available. Problem was the metallic cartridges used in those types of revolvers were extremely anemic. The lack of top strap over the cylinder made them susceptible to blowing apart.

The 1858 Remington had s full top strap and was the revolver of choice for conversion.

It wasn't until the 1873 colt army came out (known as the peacemaker) that you could use a calibre like 38-40 or 44-40 or 45 colt safely in a colt revolver.
The Remington looks sturdier..

I would just buy the Colt for sentimental reasons.

I´ve read somewhere that they didnt want revolvers that took in cartridges because the cartridges were so damn expensive then..
They wouldnt have liked it if the civil war armies used cartridges.
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Renee
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Post: # 145221Unread post Renee »

Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Old west stuff would sell in Europe...

Like the version of Colt that Clint Eastwood uses in the good, the bad and the ugly.
If I'm not mistake that was an 1851 navy, converted.

The original 1851 was cap and ball and was made famous by Wild Bill Hickok.
Thats what I thought after some reading.. The 1851navy colt is a percussion cap pistol..
Clint Eastwood loads cartridges in it.

Wild Bill Hickok´s revolver and General Lees personal sidearm.. Thats a dream revolver.
Cartridge conversions for the 1851 Navy and the 1860 Army colt were common once metallic cartridges became readily available. Problem was the metallic cartridges used in those types of revolvers were extremely anemic. The lack of top strap over the cylinder made them susceptible to blowing apart.

The 1858 Remington had s full top strap and was the revolver of choice for conversion.

It wasn't until the 1873 colt army came out (known as the peacemaker) that you could use a calibre like 38-40 or 44-40 or 45 colt safely in a colt revolver.
The Remington looks sturdier..

I would just buy the Colt for sentimental reasons.

I´ve read somewhere that they didnt want revolvers that took in cartridges because the cartridges were so damn expensive then..
They wouldnt have liked it if the civil war armies used cartridges.
Metallic cartridges were used in the American Civil War but they were used in rifles. The Henry and Spencer rifles were issued to select brigades on both sides but they used a rimfire cartridge.

The rimfire cartridges used in the rifles of the day would not have been safe to use in the open cylinder colts of the time. The .38 rimfire developed for the navy colt was quite frankly, a shitty worthless cartridge, really only good for "snakes and such". :laugh:

You were probably better off sticking with cap and ball and just carrying at least one extra loaded cylinder. It would sort of be like having a crude speed loader.

It would be years after the civil war ended that the first successful centerfire cartridges would be introduced and become popular.
“A man’s rights rest in three boxes. The ballot-box, the jury-box, and the cartridge-box.”....Frederick Douglas
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Blue Frost
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Post: # 145233Unread post Blue Frost »

Custer found them to be popular at the little Bighorn by the Indians :teehe:
Russia also when they attacked the Turks going up hill to get them :facepalm:
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Odinson
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Post: # 145300Unread post Odinson »

Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote:
Renee wrote:
Odinson wrote: Old west stuff would sell in Europe...

Like the version of Colt that Clint Eastwood uses in the good, the bad and the ugly.
If I'm not mistake that was an 1851 navy, converted.

The original 1851 was cap and ball and was made famous by Wild Bill Hickok.
Thats what I thought after some reading.. The 1851navy colt is a percussion cap pistol..
Clint Eastwood loads cartridges in it.

Wild Bill Hickok´s revolver and General Lees personal sidearm.. Thats a dream revolver.
Cartridge conversions for the 1851 Navy and the 1860 Army colt were common once metallic cartridges became readily available. Problem was the metallic cartridges used in those types of revolvers were extremely anemic. The lack of top strap over the cylinder made them susceptible to blowing apart.

The 1858 Remington had s full top strap and was the revolver of choice for conversion.

It wasn't until the 1873 colt army came out (known as the peacemaker) that you could use a calibre like 38-40 or 44-40 or 45 colt safely in a colt revolver.
The Remington looks sturdier..

I would just buy the Colt for sentimental reasons.

I´ve read somewhere that they didnt want revolvers that took in cartridges because the cartridges were so damn expensive then..
They wouldnt have liked it if the civil war armies used cartridges.
Metallic cartridges were used in the American Civil War but they were used in rifles. The Henry and Spencer rifles were issued to select brigades on both sides but they used a rimfire cartridge.

The rimfire cartridges used in the rifles of the day would not have been safe to use in the open cylinder colts of the time. The .38 rimfire developed for the navy colt was quite frankly, a shitty worthless cartridge, really only good for "snakes and such". :laugh:

You were probably better off sticking with cap and ball and just carrying at least one extra loaded cylinder. It would sort of be like having a crude speed loader.

It would be years after the civil war ended that the first successful centerfire cartridges would be introduced and become popular.
In the pics they have multiple cap and ball pistols in their belts.
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Blue Frost
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Post: # 152096Unread post Blue Frost »

So yummy, and i don't like Ranch, or Buttermilk

Chuy's Creamy Jalapeno Dip
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Re: Dessert

Post: # 192060Unread post Gary Oak »

Registered Guest wrote: October 1st, 2016, 10:32 pm I still like a bit of apple crumble and ice cream.
Don’t you dare have apple pie. It’s a painful symbol of white supremacy doncha know ? https://sputniknews.com/us/202106091083 ... acist-too/

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