Modern Western Food

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Post: # 157681Unread post Gary Oak »

I have boycotted Mcdonalds for years after finding out how their food doesn't go bad.I will still drink their coffee though. I recently watched a video showing some of the ingredients they use that keep their food from going bad and they are very unhealthy too.


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Post: # 162103Unread post Gary Oak »

I have lived my entire life without energy drinks [ coffee excluded of course ]

The Truth On What Energy Drinks Are Doing To Kids

Teens who consume too many energy drinks are also known to suffer from dehydration, tremors, heat stroke and heart attacks. Now the focus is on behavior. Are energy drinks turning teens into hyperactive, unhealthy, disobedient delinquents? Public perceptions seem to be shifting towards believing that.

In January, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver launched a campaign calling for a ban on sales of these drinks to children, and UK supermarkets wasted no time taking action. Waitrose was first, announcing plans to ban sales of the strongest drinks to under-16s. Others swiftly followed, vowing to introduce bans in March.

It seems common sense that a cocktail of stimulants will make kids hyperactive, but is there any actual evidence that energy drinks are harming children? The industry often compares the amount of caffeine in energy drinks to that in a cup of coffee, suggesting it must be safe. But new research suggests that the unique mix in energy drinks may pose higher risks.

An alarming increase in the consumption of sports and energy drinks, especially among adolescents, has been found to cause irreversible damage to teeth and erode tooth enamel.

Two research papers, suggest that concerns over levels of caffeine and sugar in energy drinks, and their effects on young people who drink them, are mounting.

Understanding what is in the beverages is key to managing that risk. Campaigners for a ban say it is important to distinguish energy drinks from sports drinks. Sports drinks contain lots of sugar, plus electrolytes, and are designed to quench thirst and rehydrate you after heavy exercise. It is the sugar in sports drinks that tends to be of concern. High sugar intake poses long-term risks of obesity, dental cavities and type-2 diabetes.

What sets energy drinks apart is the combination of high sugar content and powerful stimulants, mainly caffeine, which rapidly and temporarily increases alertness, attention and energy in consumers. This can be followed by drowsiness and a slump when the effects wear off.

"New evidence suggests that the unique mix in energy drinks may pose higher risks"

The FDA says they are powerless to change formulation of energy drinks. "We have no guidance or regulations that govern the formulation of energy drinks," said FDA spokeswoman Susan Cruzan. The agency does not have the authority to do that.Cruzan said. "Under current law, the manufacturer is responsible for ensuring that its products are safe and such products do not require FDA premarket review or approval."

"There's a tremendous amount of caffeine in these drinks," Jeanna Marraffa, a clinical toxicologist at the Upstate New York Poison Center told USA TODAY. "I would say: know what's in these products, have a sense of how much you're consuming and realize they are not safe. Certainly you can have toxic effects from them."

This sudden rush is reportedly causing problems in classrooms. In a survey of thousands of UK teachers in 2016, 13 percent blamed poor pupil behaviour on energy drinks. A 2015 study by Yale University found that students aged 11 to 14 who reported drinking energy drinks were 66 per cent more likely tobe hyperactive or show a lack of concentration.

"The bottom line is that teachers perceive these drinks create disruption," says Amelia Lake of Teesside University, UK, and co-author of a study published in November. It used focus groups with parents and pupils to explore the effects of energy drinks. "The kids end up bouncing off the walls, become jittery, uncontrollable, are unable to concentrate and have slumps in the afternoon," she says.

Energy drinks have also been reported to disrupt sleep, probably because of their caffeine content. If this happens, Lake says, it could impair the growth of the adolescent body and brain, which occurs mainly during sleep.

Caffeine has other potential effects on health, too. A Europe-wide review published in 2014 by researchers at the World Health Organization cited a range of symptoms associated with high caffeine intake, including palpitations, high blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, convulsions and even, in extreme amounts, d eath. It cited US studies that found associations between energy drinks and high-risk behaviours including fighting, sexual risk-taking, failure to wear seatbelts, taking dares, smoking, drinking and illicit drug use.


Sales Spike

Concern over energy drinks is growing because consumption is widespread and rising. A report by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in 2013 found that across Europe, 68 per cent of adolescents and 18 per cent of children aged 10 and under were knocking them back. In the UK, the corresponding figures were 69 and 24 per cent, and young Brits were drinking the highest volumes, at 3.1 litres per person per month versus the European average of 2 litres. Some "high chronic" drinkers consume 7 litres per month. A more recent study says UK sales of energy drinks to all age groups increased by 155 per cent between 2006 and 2014, from 235 to 600 million litres.

With these apparent risks to young people, why haven't countries been rushing to stop children buying energy drinks? One reason is the assumption - both by regulatory bodies and the drinks industry - that a specific amount of caffeine has the same effect on health and behaviour whether it is drunk in an energy drink or in coffee.

Now, research has emerged that challenges this "all caffeine is equivalent" assumption. An online survey of some 2000 Canadians aged between 12 and 24 found that 74 per cent had consumed energy drinks and 85 per cent had consumed coffee. Just over 55 per cent of the energy-drink consumers reported having at least one adverse event, compared with 36 per cent of coffee drinkers.

Among the energy-drink consumers, 25 per cent had experienced fast heartbeat, 24 per cent difficulty sleeping, 18 per cent headaches, 5 per cent nausea and vomiting and 3.6 per cent chest pain. In general, energy drink consumers reported adverse events at roughly double the rate of coffee drinkers.

"Our findings indicate that the adverse events from energy drinks are significantly higher than from coffee," says David Hammond of the University of Waterloo in Canada, who led the work, published last month (CMAJ Open, doi.org/cj34). "Our findings and those of an increasing number of other groups challenge the ‘equivalence' assumption."

"These drinks all have other stuff, not just the caffeine," says Marcie Schneider of Greenwich Adolescent Medicine in Connecticut. This includes taurine, which acts like caffeine, and guarana, which increases its potency. "I would love it if safety levels were revisited." She was an author of a study for the American Academy of Pediatrics in 2011 concluding that energy drinks "are not appropriate for children and adolescents, and should never be consumed [by them]".

New Scientist put Hammond's findings to the British Soft Drinks Association, which said that it refers any new evidence to the EFSA. "We will be guided by EFSA if there is new evidence, but there's nothing yet that's changed the opinion of EFSA on the amount of caffeine in energy drinks," says a spokesperson.

An EFSA spokesperson said that the agency never comments on a single paper unless specifically requested to do so by governments or the European Union.

The EFSA recommends safety levels for caffeine in the EU, but member states are free to set their own limits and conditions, and Lithuania banned the sale of all energy drinks to under-18s in 2014. Almantas Kranauskas, head of nutrition at Lithuania's Ministry of Health, says the government doesn't track consumption statistics, but the ban appears to be having an effect. "Frequent media stories about overdosed pupils going to hospitals disappeared after the ban, and we believe children became more patient and less anxious in schools," he says.

But in the UK, the flurry of supermarket action has raised the prospect of a national ban, something campaigners like Jamie Oliver believe is necessary to stop children buying the drinks from smaller outlets. "While it's fantastic that supermarkets have shown such brilliant leadership on this issue, government must legislate, because children can still buy these drinks from convenience stores," says Cath Elliston of Oliver's team.

"The adverse events from energy drinks are significantly higher than from coffee"

The UK government has already taken some action in this area. A tax on drinks containing excess sugar comes into force in April, and many manufacturers have reduced the sugar content of their products as a result.

"It would be a big success to get [a ban] legislated," she says. "It would change perceptions and understanding of where these products are appropriate, and bring a new generation of children who know these are not for kids, creating a new norm on a par with smoking and alcohol."

Mounting Evidence Exposes Dangers of Energy Drinks

http://preventdisease.com/news/18/02091 ... Kids.shtml
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Post: # 162139Unread post Blue Frost »

The closest thing to an Energy drink I have taken was tea, gives me some energy without the bad stuff.
A little honey in it is boost enough :)
The tax on stuff like that is uncalled for, people know the dangers.
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Post: # 162140Unread post Odinson »

I have drank several million redbull&vodka shots..

Redbull keeps you from passing out.. Which can be a bad thing for every1 around you. :teehe:


I dont drink energy drinks anymore... Just coffee.
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Post: # 162147Unread post Blue Frost »

I like the smell of fresh ground coffee, but not the taste.
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Post: # 162151Unread post Odinson »

Blue Frost wrote: February 14th, 2018, 1:51 pm I like the smell of fresh ground coffee, but not the taste.
Its an acquired taste..

Kinda like beer..
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Post: # 162157Unread post Blue Frost »

I think beer smells like pee, the hops are nasty smelling.
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Post: # 162159Unread post Odinson »

Blue Frost wrote: February 14th, 2018, 5:04 pm I think beer smells like pee, the hops are nasty smelling.
I remember thinking that when I was a kid and first tasted beer.

Some of the labels still taste and smell like piss..


Not that I´ve ever tasted piss but I can imagine the taste from the smell. :teehe:


Finnish label "bear, dark" is the best..
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Post: # 162162Unread post Blue Frost »

Ill stick to my chocolate milk for a bad habit, keep your beer. :spit:
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Post: # 167104Unread post Gary Oak »

The brains nearotransmitters also won't be getting the chemicals they need from the amino acids that they need to create them.

Just How Bad an Idea Is the ‘Carnivore Diet’?

ou ate nothing but steak for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, would you die? Get scurvy? Have terrible poops? To be honest, the science isn’t totally clear on this, but we asked some experts anyway. (Spoiler: they think it’s a bad idea.)
Do people actually eat this diet?

There are definitely people who say they have eaten only meat for years. I’m not sure if I truly believe them, though. There are also people who say they don’t eat food and survive off the energy of the universe, but they kind of have to be sneaking snacks when nobody is looking. How many supposedly strict carnivores give in and have a doughnut every now and then (or, hopefully, a fruit or vegetable?) Nobody knows.
What nutrients is meat missing?

It depends how you define “meat”. A raw ribeye steak, fat trimmed off, has little to none of your vitamins A, C, E, D, and K; very little folate, another vitamin; and very little calcium or manganese.

But if you allow yourself other animal products, you’ll do a lot better. Eggs can make up for the missing vitamins A, E, D, and folate, for example. Still, you’re at serious risk of scurvy.

Can You Get Scurvy From Eating Nothing But Ramen?

It seems everybody knows someone who knows someone who got scurvy in college. So there was this…

Of reddit’s and Facebook’s carnivore diet support groups, all encourage eating muscle meat and fat. Most allow eggs and fish as well. Dairy is controversial: in some groups it’s allowed, in others you’re encouraged to stick to butter and avoid milk, and for the purists it’s not really being a carnivore. Some groups call themselves “zero carb,” although that label is a misnomer if you eat dairy; milk contains tons of lactose, which is a sugar and therefore a carb.

When people like the Inuit live on mostly meat diets, they’re not just having steaks and eggs. Traditional animal-based diets typically involve organ meats and even the stomach and intestinal contents of herbivores. That is, you’ll note, a way to get the nutrients in vegetables since you are in fact eating vegetables. (The Inuit also gathered and ate plants too.)

“Alternatively you can go for some breifly boiled ptarmigan intestines filled with green pasty…

So what happens?

We don’t have any large, rigorous studies on what happens to the body when people eat a “carnivore diet.” Nutrition professor Rachele Pojednic pointed us to this account from the late 1920s of two men who ate nothing but meat for a full year. Both had been Arctic explorers, and were used to living on animal products for months at a time. They lived in a metabolic ward, under observation, for a few periods of weeks at a time; the rest of the time they lived at home but promised they were keeping the same diet.

They didn’t die. By the end, “the subjects were mentally alert, physically active, and showed no specific physical changes in any system of the body.” Both lost weight for a short period at the beginning, but weren’t significantly lighter by the end of the study. They excreted ketones in their urine, a sign that their bodies were burning fat in exactly the way you would expect if you’re eating a ton of fat and no carbs. Their blood, when drawn, had a visible fatty layer in it.
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Their diet was very different, though, from Mikhaila Peterson’s three steaks a day. Each man ate, on a typical day, between 100 and 140 grams of protein, 200 to 300 grams of fat, and almost no carbs. (Meat has a tiny amount of carbohydrate. Very tiny.) Here’s what they actually ate:

The meat used included beef, lamb, veal, pork, and chicken. The parts used were muscle, liver, kidney, brain, bone marrow, bacon, and fat. While on lecture trips [one subject] occasionally ate eggs and a little butter when meat was not readily obtainable.

While one of the subjects was settling in to the metabolic ward, the researchers wrote, “the subject had a craving of calf brain of which he ate freely.” At one point the men requested frozen raw meat for a change of pace, but this was the days before freezers were standard equipment, so none was available.
What about the poops?

This is a major subject of discussion in carnivore diet groups, with many people reporting diarrhea as they try to get used to the diet, and others describing what sounds like constipation. These groups are optimistic places, though, and posters typically put a sunny spin on any obstacles they face. You’re not having trouble with the diet, you’re just getting used to it.

Back in 1930, the researchers were happy with the explorers’ output. “The stools were smaller than usual, well formed, and had an inoffensive, slightly pungent odor,” they write. One man had diarrhea, but they chalked that up to a too-high protein intake (around 40 percent of his calories).

Ashwin Ananthakrishnan of the American Gastroenterological Association explains that a meat-only diet is likely to be bad for your gut in many ways. By avoiding plants, you’re missing out on bacterial species that tend to be anti-inflammatory, and you’re not getting the soluble fiber from fruits and vegetables that helps to keep your gut barrier intact. If you want to keep good intestinal health, you really need to include plants in your diet.
Are there long-term risks?

“I honestly think one of the biggest risks of the carnivore diet is colon cancer,” says Pojednic, the nutrition professor, “but we won’t have data on that for years to come (and this would also mean that someone needs to do a study on this diet, which I honestly don’t see happening).” People who eat a lot of red meat and processed meat are at a high risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Diets high in fat have been associated with risk factors for heart attacks and other cardiovascular disease. This is still somewhat controversial, because it’s been hard to separate the effects of fat from those of other foods like sugar (people who eat a lot of cheeseburgers also eat a lot of doughnuts) and because there are different types of fats, and whenever you remove one from the diet, you have to replace it with another. This is the classic question about whether butter is good for you or bad for you; the answer is, it’s complicated.

Despite That New Study, Everything We Know About Nutrition Is Pretty Much Still True

A study released this week in The Lancet found a link between high carbohydrate intake and risk of…
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The bottom line is, this may not kill you right away, but the internet’s version of the carnivore diet (no relation to animal-product-heavy traditional diets) is missing essential nutrients and is probably bad for your health in the long term.

https://vitals.lifehacker.com/just-how- ... 1828260514
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Post: # 167375Unread post Gary Oak »

They hire scientists to scam people into eating their unhealthy food ! They really don't care at all about the people buying their products. This is an evil scam that I wasn't aware of.

How Scientists Engineer Foods to Make Them Dangerously Addictive

It’s no secret that the standard American diet is having a terrible effect on human health. What’s is a secret, though, is how the food industry uses science and psychology to create processed food products that are devoid of nutrition, full of chemical additives and colorings, and incredibly addictive.



In fact, the science of how food companies get customers physically, mentally and emotionally hooked on their products reads like a good conspiracy theory. Major food manufacturers know good and well that repeat customers can be made by tricking the mind and body and overriding our natural tendency to seek out healthy, satisfying foods.
“The public and the food companies have known for decades now — or at the very least since this meeting — that sugary, salty, fatty foods are not good for us in the quantities that we consume them. So why are the diabetes and obesity and hypertension numbers still spiraling out of control? It’s not just a matter of poor willpower on the part of the consumer and a give-the-people-what-they-want attitude on the part of the food manufacturers. What I found, over four years of research and reporting, was a conscious effort — taking place in labs and marketing meetings and grocery-store aisles — to get people hooked on foods that are convenient and inexpensive. ” ~Michael Moss
The story revolves physiology, psychology and neuroscience, and three key ingredients: salt, sugar and fat. And at the core of addictive food science is our understanding of physiology and neurochemical responses to foods. Scientists have been able to boil this down to a simple equation: The Food Pleasure Equation.
“The Food Pleasure Equation postulates that the brain has the ability to quantify the pleasure contained in an eating experience as performed by certain dopamine neurons in the brain and the sensing of calories by the gut. When you have a food choice, the brain actually calculates how much pleasure will be generated during the eating and digestion of a particular food. The goal of the brain, gut, and fat cell is to maximize the pleasure extracted from the environment, both in food sensation and macronutrient content. If a food is lowered in calories for health reasons, the gut has the ability to sense this, and the food will become less palatable over time.” [Source]
The work of the food scientist is to figure out how to override this function and trick the brain and body into believing that high calorie, nutrient-poor foods will offer a reward in the form of nutrition and satisfaction. To do this, they look primarily at a short list of key factors.

In a recent article about food cravings and how to beat them, James Clear, author of Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones, elaborates on the six key dynamics involved in tricking you into becoming hooked on junk foods.
Dynamic contrast. Dynamic contrast refers to a combination of different sensations in the same food. In the words of Witherly, foods with dynamic contrast have “an edible shell that goes crunch followed by something soft or creamy and full of taste-active compounds. This rule applies to a variety of our favorite food structures — the caramelized top of a creme brulee, a slice of pizza, or an Oreo cookie — the brain finds crunching through something like this very novel and thrilling.”

Salivary response. Salivation is part of the experience of eating food and the more that a food causes you to salivate, the more it will swim throughout your mouth and cover your taste buds. For example, emulsified foods like butter, chocolate, salad dressing, ice cream, and mayonnaise promote a salivary response that helps to lather your taste buds with goodness. This is one reason why many people enjoy foods that have sauces or glazes on them. The result is that foods that promote salivation do a happy little tap dance on your brain and taste better than ones that don’t.


Free tools on how to detox other people's emotions and reclaim your power.
Rapid food meltdown and vanishing caloric density. Foods that rapidly vanish or “melt in your mouth” signal to your brain that you’re not eating as much as you actually are. In other words, these foods literally tell your brain that you’re not full, even though you’re eating a lot of calories.
The result: you tend to overeat.

Sensory specific response. Your brain likes variety. When it comes to food, if you experience the same taste over and over again, then you start to get less pleasure from it. In other words, the sensitivity of that specific sensor will decrease over time. This can happen in just minutes.

Junk foods, however, are designed to avoid this sensory specific response. They provide enough taste to be interesting (your brain doesn’t get tired of eating them), but it’s not so stimulating that your sensory response is dulled. This is why you can swallow an entire bag of potato chips and still be ready to eat another. To your brain, the crunch and sensation of eating Doritos is novel and interesting every time.

Calorie density. Junk foods are designed to convince your brain that it is getting nutrition, but to not fill you up. Receptors in your mouth and stomach tell your brain about the mixture of proteins, fats, carbohydrates in a particular food, and how filling that food is for your body. Junk food provides just enough calories that your brain says, “Yes, this will give you some energy” but not so many calories that you think “That’s enough, I’m full.” The result is that you crave the food to begin with, but it takes quite some time to feel full from it.

Memories of past eating experiences. This is where the psychobiology of junk food really works against you. When you eat something tasty (say, a bag of potato chips), your brain registers that feeling. The next time you see that food, smell that food, or even read about that food, your brain starts to trigger the memories and responses that came when you ate it. These memories can actually cause physical responses like salivation and create the “mouth-watering” craving that you get when thinking about your favorite foods. [Source]
Final Thoughts
Scientists have outsmarted your taste buds and your body’s natural ability to identify the right foods to eat. Knowing this allows you to beat them at this game. Your health depends on it.

https://www.wakingtimes.com/2018/08/20/ ... addictive/
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Post: # 167761Unread post Gary Oak »

My solution for reducing the sugar intake of these drinks is to not drink any of them ever.

Here's how much sugar is actually in some of the biggest drinks in the US as Americans revolt against beverage giants pushing sugar-packed products

https://www.businessinsider.com/sugar-c ... 8-8#teas-5
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Post: # 180926Unread post Blue Frost »

Of course I talk to myself. Sometimes I need expert advise, and a good conversation.
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Re: Modern Western Food

Post: # 198823Unread post Gary Oak »

Apparently Skittles are loaded with unsafe levels of titanium dioxide in their colours. “Research shows that the effects are serious, including DNA and chromosomal damage, organ damage, inflammation, brain damage, genital malformations, lesions in the liver and kidneys, and cell neurosis.”https://www.theepochtimes.com/lawsuit-c ... NcWA%3D%3D
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Post: # 198882Unread post Blue Frost »

Yellow colors are the most toxic, or used to be.
Coming up this coming month Ill be having a bunch of the stuff, those birthday cakes are full of the stuff :happy: :blush:
It's really a shame petrol, heavy metals, and other poisons are put in our foods .

That's our good old FDA, CDC, and other agencies looking out for us isn't it. :kez:
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Post: # 199629Unread post Twilight turtle »

I've tried to avoid fake foods for a long time... if it's not from nature. :kez:
They've had most folks out working long hours and too tired to do homemade or home cooked anymore seems like.

The ones that engineered this system couldn't care less tho, they just find other ways to make money from the fallout from it. :kez:
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Re: Modern Western Food

Post: # 199643Unread post Gary Oak »

I try to avoid processed foods but I am not fanatical about it.
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Post: # 199651Unread post Twilight turtle »

Same here... most of it over wrapped in all that jazzy packaging puts you off as well.
I wish I had a piece of land and grow some things myself.
Next best thing is pots with tomato plants.
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Re: Modern Western Food

Post: # 199653Unread post Gary Oak »

Even as a teenager eons ago I always looked at the ingredients of everything I bought. I am less strict on salt now but increasingly strict on sugar. If there’s too many chemicals then I am not interested.
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Re: Modern Western Food

Post: # 199665Unread post Twilight turtle »

I do sometimes, still... I never buy those fizzy drinks, they look like they're straight out of the chemical factory.

Look at dried packet instant soup... you need a chemist's degree to decipher it. :kez:

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