Tibet

In search of truth, the mysterious, and bizarre. Gary rules here.
Forum rules
Civil discussion appreciated. No Spam...
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Tibet

Post: # 34277Unread post Gary Oak »

http://www.tibetnetwork.org/campaign-gonpotsering

This is a very good friend of mine. He is a great guy. He got out of prison last April when he got out of prisonn and we talked but he was afraid to say anything as no doubt his phone was being monitored. He and his brother Tabu have no uncles because the chinese killed his fathers five brothers and only allowed his father to live because he was thirteen. This is what happens when chinese are allowed to take over ones nation


User avatar
Blue Frost
SUPER VIP
SUPER VIP
Posts: 98502
Joined: May 14th, 2012, 1:01 am
Location: Yodenheim

Re: Tibet

Post: # 34278Unread post Blue Frost »

A scared nation, or more government arrest people for speaking out against them.
Control is not as easy unless you kill people, and put them in fear.
The Chinese government I hope falls some day to become something better, and let people have their freedoms to chose their leaders.

Have to say I wish we had a real choice .
"Being alone isn't what hurts. It's when the people around you make you feel alone" ~ Naruto Uzumaki, an Anime Character
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 34979Unread post Gary Oak »

http://deanhenderson.wordpress.com/2013 ... haramsala/

It's a great thing and india should be commended for allowing the Tibetans such a large area of Indias overpopulated country to maintain their culture. China is furious at india for not aiding China in it's genocidal and culturalocidal policies towards Tibet and Tibetans. If I ever go to India dharmasala is one place where I should visit
User avatar
Blue Frost
SUPER VIP
SUPER VIP
Posts: 98502
Joined: May 14th, 2012, 1:01 am
Location: Yodenheim

Re: Tibet

Post: # 34985Unread post Blue Frost »

Good for India, I hope they can afford those people. At least on the most part they are peaceful people from what I gather, I would welcome them here If I could.
"Being alone isn't what hurts. It's when the people around you make you feel alone" ~ Naruto Uzumaki, an Anime Character
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Robert Ford Passed Age 90

Post: # 63241Unread post Gary Oak »

http://www.economist.com/news/obituary/ ... obert-ford

Here is a little interesting piece of Tibetan history
User avatar
Blue Frost
SUPER VIP
SUPER VIP
Posts: 98502
Joined: May 14th, 2012, 1:01 am
Location: Yodenheim

Re: Tibet

Post: # 63251Unread post Blue Frost »

Sad to here the Chinese did that to him, at least he wasn't killed, or worse.
You have to think of those who did break, and likely died also.
"Being alone isn't what hurts. It's when the people around you make you feel alone" ~ Naruto Uzumaki, an Anime Character
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 114799Unread post Gary Oak »

India has to be commended for in spite of having little land to spare allowing the Tibetan people a place [ Dharamsala ] to keep their amazing culture from being exterminated and the Tibetan people from being genocided.

-Sasaki Roshi

Dharamsala

10-21-88

In search of a hotel, I wander down a side street and notice a sign that says “Tibetan Guest House”. I walk up a narrow staircase and a pudgy 14-year-old girl comes to the door. Her pleasant demeanor captures my imagination. She and her six brothers and sisters are huddled around a television watching Bill Cosby. I take a room. The girl brings me a huge bowl of vegetables and noodles with chopsticks, followed by the best coffee I’ve had in India.

Her little brother climbs up on a chair, grabs of pack of Four Square cigarettes from atop the refrigerator and offers me one. Their mother brings me a soda. Their father walks in with fluorescent bulbs for the whole house, as if my arrival has brought them spirited rejuvenation. The kids surround him and wait for their turn at a hug. Some are content with a pat on the head. These are people who know intimately the secrets to happiness. I need to stay awhile.

I wonder if praise is not one of our biggest mistakes. When an Ituri Pygmy hunter comes home from having killed a springbuck, he gets no praise from his fellow tribesmen and is the last to receive his portion of meat. Out of this silence the hunter learns humility. He learns that his fate and that of his tribe are one. Praise for his efforts would only create a schism of the whole and fill the hunter with arrogance.

In America, when one praises a friend exceedingly, that friend often begins to mistreat his or her admirer. To praise someone is to put them on a pedestal – separate from the masses of un-praised others. It is a product of dualistic thinking athe root of scores of flawed Western philosophical underpinnings.

This conundrum may explain why I always feel that I need to leave America where I treat everyone as if they are intrinsically good. Westerners, trained in dualistic thinking, take this as weakness on my part. They see my kindness as a green light to take, to gain some emotional advantage. I do not find such a dilemma in India or for that matter any other Third World nations I have visited. Here kindness is greeted by reciprocation.

I guess Reagan and his supply-siders are right in one sense about their trickle-down theories. An evil government imparts its paranoid set of values to its citizenry, whose collective denial of a bloody colonial history only reinforces the “taker” mindset. To stop and question the rules of this rigged game would be to risk losing one’s television or VCR or, God forbid, one’s cherished automobile. Westerners live in a state of guilt, shame and fear – knowing in their guts, but never acknowledging, the trail of tears they have left in their wake.

Their penance is their work, their half-hearted daily grind, their boring monotonous meaningless assignment from the cruel Great White teacher. Their weekends are spent indulging in a swirl of contradictions that, by gosh, they deserve after spending all week doing penance. They break out their speedboats, gorge at fine restaurants, guzzle copious amounts of alcohol and throw their hard-earned money back into the whirling cogs of the system. They do not deserve freedom. They must repent. They are the system.

No one’s heart is sad at birth. No one is filled with gloom when their tiny eyes first awaken to the world outside their mother’s womb. No amount of phony social Darwinist propaganda can make it so. Charles Darwin, whose “survival of the fittest” terminology is often invoked by wealthy fat Republicans as justification for their callous journey through this life, actually argued that the most important key to human and animal survival was “cooperation within species”. The entire debate over whether man is naturally good or evil is itself a dualistic windstorm that could only take place within the simplistic minds of the colonial West.

Surely man has the ability to do both good and evil. He must choose which path to embark upon – one of fear and greed, or one of love and compassion. Yet his circumstances greatly influence the nature of his soul. His environment plays a much greater role than his DNA. Most pit bulls are socialized to be family protectors or worse – stone cold killers. But some pit bulls are not instructed so, and are as gentle as lambs.

A grizzly bear in Kodiak, Alaska – well-fed on salmon and unused to human interaction – is much less likely to maul a person than one in Yellowstone National Park, where his habitat is a tiny island of government protection and where ignorant humans are constantly pestering him for photographs.

While the Aryans have a lock on colonization, there were rapists among the Zulu and murderers among the Lakota. These bad apples likely were impacted by negative events in their childhood and the like. But Aryan history books exaggerate these anomalies in an attempt to justify colonial endeavors.

Tribal peoples treated their offenders much more compassionately. Wrongdoers in tribal cultures were shunned and sent away for a period of time. Wrongdoers in colonial cultures are executed, upsetting the cosmic balance and reinforcing the dualistic thinking that alienates industrialized man from both earth and other cultures. We can kill criminals because we believe in the dualism that they are the bad people and we the good. The fact that tribal cultures did not kill their criminals speaks volumes to their humility, to their lack of dualism-driven fear and to their earth-inspired wisdom.

By all accounts the shunning of offenders worked. Recidivism among Lakota offenders was virtually non-existent. The person knew he did wrong, but he also discovered that his life was too valuable to be taken. Thus, the value of all life was reinforced in both his mind and in the collective mind of the culture.

Modern-day prisoners in South Africa, Israel, the US or China – all subject to death at the whim of their governments – hold no such respect for human life. Nor do the people who live in those countries. The nature of human existence holds no relevance in arguments for or against the death penalty. Nor does it matter in any discussion of social policy. Our decision is one of which path we shall take from right here and now.

Will we choose a path of darkness and nihilism, or will we choose one that restores balance and harmony to earth and its inhabitants? When we feel good about who we are we do good things. Happiness and justice are two results of harmony – one and the same thing.

McLeod Ganje sits above Dharamsala, which is perched at 6,400’ above sea level. McLeod is a refuge for Tibetans who fled their homes following the 1949 Chinese Revolution. Their spiritual leader the Dalai Lama led them to this new mountain home, also a refuge for travelers to India who grow weary of the hot crowded hassle-ridden lowlands. Here there is much compassion and deafening silence, echoing cheerfully off snow-capped peaks.

Today the 14th Dalai Lama speaks at a three-day celebration of Tibetan culture. His presence is gentle power to an open heart. His message is compassion, which is the central tenet of Tibetan Buddhism. This ideal emerged from the philosophies of Ghautama Buddha, who centuries earlier in northern India, recognized that of all the values revered in his native Hinduism, compassion was the only one that really mattered.

The Dalai Lama, whom some have written was aided by the CIA in his exit from Tibet, does not blame the invasion by Chairman Mao’s Red Army for his people’s tribulations. He attributes the act to the karma of the Tibetan people themselves. He discourages divisive language of any kind since it creates a reality where dualistic thought becomes the paradigm.

Without duality there can be no enemies. He encourages compassionate living as the path to good karma and nirvana. To en-courage is to be courageous. To dis-courage is cowardice.

This tiny village is living peace – heaven on earth. I have not seen a happier, more content or more compassionate people. I feel it in the simple gourmet food, in the sparse spotless hotel rooms that you pay for when you leave, in the suddenly smiling Westerners taken aback by the joy of the place, and in the Himalayan foothills that surround the village and remind me of my smallness – peaks now shrouded in gray-white billowy clouds through which even more remote villages come into view.

This evening the sound of Tibetan gongs mingles with the chattering of rhesus monkeys and macaques playing in the surrounding forest. The few cars here carry Indian tourists back down the mountain, leaving in their wake a silence so profound that I feel every dry swallow and breath of air. The sun lays itself to rest over the Changra Valley and the gentle hand of the Buddha blankets McLeod Ganje in starry darkness.

After my usual breakfast of lemon curd cake and mint tea at the Toepa Restaurant, I begin my ascent towards the Tibetan children’s village, where a festival is in its second day. I pass dancing monks in outrageous costumes and a monastery where young monks debate with the fire of Fidel Castro. I can’t stop walking. Soon I arrive at Dal Lake.

I turn left on a road heading up into the Daula Dar range. I pass through the village of Niddi, where Gadi nomadic herder girls tend their sheep and goats. At the next village of Talanu the pavement ends. I take a narrow winding dirt path around the side of a majestic mountain and suddenly, I am struck with awe.

Perched high on a ridge jutting out amidst a panorama of Himalayan peaks sits Nande Ashram. I walk to the door and am greeted with a gentle smile. The man does not say a word, but motions me inside. He leads me to a bare room, closing the door behind him as he leaves. I sit in lotus position and meditate for many hours, focusing on the in and out motions of my diaphragm muscle – focusing on my breathing, emptying my mind.

I emerge into the fresh mountain air a new person. I have escaped the torture of my own mind. I notice everything. I have empathy and love for everyone. I cannot wipe the smile off my face. I pass a young Gadi girl herding goats as I begin my walk down the trail. She is glowing in her bright purple dress and headscarf. She is God.

I float back to the dancing monks feeling myself a tiny but important part of a collective streaming consciousness. Surrounded by Tibetan children, I take a seat at the festivities towards the back of the crowd where I can observe the entire scene – the dancing monks, the exuberant crowd, the sun on the meadow.

Westerners snap photos, bored children fidget, and mothers serve their families tea from air pots sitting on blankets on the cool grass. The colorful monks move in slow motion to the deliberate rhythms of a small drum corps, occasionally twirling suddenly as if disturbed from their slumber.

Tonight I go to Bhagsu School, site of an all-night party. I am greeted at the door with a glass of Tibetan beer. Before I am finished, I have another full glass in my hand, then another. There is no talk of money. Only more smiles and more rice beer. Three hours later I stumble down the hill. In the moonlight I notice a woman. Soon we are laughing uncontrollably and smoking hash. She is a gem-smuggler from the Netherlands. I zigzag my way back to the Tibetan Guest House for one last night’s sleep in heaven.

A man on a scooter picks me up in the morning chill just outside Dharamsala. He agrees to take me to his hometown of Kanga. We stop for a warm-up and tea. He is an Indian lawyer, a well-educated public defender. He launches into a political diatribe denouncing CIA involvement in the Punjab drugs for guns trade that fuels the war in Kashmir just north of here.

He says the CIA pushes brown sugar (unrefined heroin) on India’s youth in an attempt to shut down their minds, while providing arms to separatists in an attempt to partition India. He says that India’s leadership in the Non-Aligned Movement is what makes his socialist country a target of the US.

I wait at the bus station in Kanga, fending off Indian youth and their predictable inquiries regarding American women and war movies. The bus to Dehra Dun leaves at 10:00 PM. I will go to Rishikesh, where John Lennon and George Harrison spent time meditating on the meaning of life. The Garwhal Mountains beckon. I pass time reading J. Khrishnamurti, who proclaims that it is at the very moment when one sees oneself as separate from the other – from the whole – that corruption begins.

Dean Henderson is the author of five books: Big Oil & Their Bankers in the Persian Gulf: Four Horsemen, Eight Families & Their Global Intelligence, Narcotics & Terror Network, The Grateful Unrich: Revolution in 50 Countries,Das Kartell der Federal Reserve, Stickin’ it to the Matrix & The Federal Reserve Cartel. You can subscribe free to his weekly Left Hook column @www.hendersonlefthook.wordpress.com
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 136385Unread post Gary Oak »

I find this very interesting. The Ghurkas in the British army had amazing stamina as the Sherpa's also are famous for their ability to climb Everest easily. Tibetans being part homo sapien and part Denisovan icould explain their unique manner. [ the Tibetan girls are vey charming ] The Tietans are a very unique people with a very unique culture. I hope that China will not successfully genocide and culturalocide the Tibetan people.

Breathing easy. This Tibetan inherited a beneficial high-altitude gene from archaic Denisovan people.
Beijing Genomics Institute
Tibetans inherited high-altitude gene from ancient human
By Ann GibbonsJul. 2, 2014 , 3:00 PM
A “superathlete” gene that helps Sherpas and other Tibetans breathe easy at high altitudes was inherited from an ancient species of human. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which finds that the gene variant came from people known as Denisovans, who went extinct soon after they mated with the ancestors of Europeans and Asians about 40,000 years ago. This is the first time a version of a gene acquired from interbreeding with another type of human has been shown to help modern humans adapt to their environment.

Researchers have long wondered how Tibetans live and work at altitudes above 4000 meters, where the limited supply of oxygen makes most people sick. Other high-altitude people, such as Andean highlanders, have adapted to such thin air by adding more oxygen-carrying hemoglobin to their blood. But Tibetans have adapted by having less hemoglobin in their blood; scientists think this trait helps them avoid serious problems, such as clots and strokes caused when the blood thickens with more hemoglobin-laden red blood cells.

Researchers discovered in 2010 that Tibetans have several genes that help them use smaller amounts of oxygen efficiently, allowing them to deliver enough of it to their limbs while exercising at high altitude. Most notable is a version of a gene called EPAS1, which regulates the body’s production of hemoglobin. They were surprised, however, by how rapidly the variant of EPAS1 spread—initially, they thought it spread in 3000 years through 40% of high-altitude Tibetans, which is the fastest genetic sweep ever observed in humans—and they wondered where it came from.

Now, an international team of researchers has sequenced the EPAS1 gene in 40 Tibetans and 40 Han Chinese. Both were once part of the same population that split into two groups sometime between 2750 to 5500 years ago. Population geneticist Rasmus Nielsen of the University of California, Berkeley, his postdoc Emilia Huerta-Sanchez, and their colleagues analyzed the DNA and found that the Tibetans and only two of the 40 Han Chinese had a distinctive segment of the EPAS1 gene in which five letters of the genetic code were identical. When they searched the most diverse catalog of genomes from people around the world in the 1000 Genomes Project, they could not find a single other living person who had the same code.

Then, the team compared the gene variant with DNA sequences from archaic humans, including Neandertals and a Denisovan, whose genome was sequenced from the DNA in a girl’s finger bone from Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains of Siberia. The Denisovan and Tibetan segments matched closely.

The team also compared the full EPAS1 gene between populations around the world and confirmed that the Tibetans’ inherited the entire gene from Denisovans in the past 40,000 years or so—or from an even earlier ancestor that carried that DNA and passed it on to both Denisovans and modern humans. But they ruled out the second scenario—that the gene was inherited from the last ancestor that modern humans shared with Denisovans more than 400,000 years ago because such a large gene, or segment of DNA, would have accumulated mutations and broken up over that much time—and the Tibetans’ and Denisovans’ versions of the gene wouldn’t match as closely as they do today.

But just how did the Tibetans inherit this gene from people who lived 40,000 years before them in Siberia and other parts of Asia? Using computer modeling, Nielsen and his team found the only plausible explanation was that the ancestors of Tibetans and Han Chinese got the gene by mating with Denisovans. The genome of this enigmatic people has revealed that they were more closely related to Neandertals than to modern humans and they once ranged across Asia, so they may have lived near the ancestors of Tibetans and Han Chinese. Other recent studies have shown that although Melanesians in Papua New Guinea have the highest levels of Denisovan DNA today (about 5% of their genome), some Han Chinese and mainland Asians retain a low level of Denisovan ancestry (about 0.2% to 2%), suggesting that much of their Denisovan ancestry has been wiped out or lost over time as their small populations were absorbed by much larger groups of modern humans.

Although most Han Chinese and other groups lost the Denisovans’ version of the EPAS1 gene because it wasn’t particularly beneficial, Tibetans who settled on the high-altitude Tibetan plateau retained it because it helped them adapt to life there, the team reports online today in Nature. The gene variant was favored by natural selection, so it spread rapidly to many Tibetans.

A few Han Chinese—perhaps 1% to 2%—still carry the Denisovan version of the EPAS1 gene today because the interbreeding took place when the ancestors of Tibetans and Chinese were still part of one group some 40,000 years ago. But the gene was later lost in most Chinese, or the Han Chinese may have acquired it more recently from interbreeding with Tibetans, Nielsen says.

Either way, what is most interesting, Nielsen says, is that the results show that mating with other groups was an important source of beneficial genes in human evolution. “Modern humans didn’t wait for new mutations to adapt to a new environment,” he says. “They could pick up adaptive traits by interbreeding.”

The discovery is the second case in which modern humans have acquired a trait from archaic humans, notes paleogeneticist Svante Pääbo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, whose team discovered the Denisovan people. Earlier this year, another team showed that Mayans, in particular, have inherited a gene variant from Neandertals that increases the risk for diabetes.

The ultimate irony, Nielsen notes, is that, once we got this beneficial gene, we never returned the favor. Instead, we may have helped drive the Denisovans extinct.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/07/ ... ient-human
User avatar
Blue Frost
SUPER VIP
SUPER VIP
Posts: 98502
Joined: May 14th, 2012, 1:01 am
Location: Yodenheim

Re: Tibet

Post: # 136395Unread post Blue Frost »

Peruvians have a special trait of being able to deal with high altitudes as well.
"Being alone isn't what hurts. It's when the people around you make you feel alone" ~ Naruto Uzumaki, an Anime Character
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 136400Unread post Gary Oak »

But are the Peruvians part extinct humanoid species ?
User avatar
Blue Frost
SUPER VIP
SUPER VIP
Posts: 98502
Joined: May 14th, 2012, 1:01 am
Location: Yodenheim

Re: Tibet

Post: # 136402Unread post Blue Frost »

Being they have some Asian DNA they likely do, but being that they have been there so long like The Tibetans where they are they gain that ability.
"Being alone isn't what hurts. It's when the people around you make you feel alone" ~ Naruto Uzumaki, an Anime Character
User avatar
Blue Frost
SUPER VIP
SUPER VIP
Posts: 98502
Joined: May 14th, 2012, 1:01 am
Location: Yodenheim

Re: Tibet

Post: # 136404Unread post Blue Frost »

if you google both peoples they looks a lot a like, they could mingle together I think, and nobody would tell the difference.
"Being alone isn't what hurts. It's when the people around you make you feel alone" ~ Naruto Uzumaki, an Anime Character
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 136451Unread post Gary Oak »

Perhaps because I havelived with natives and have lived overseas for a long time and have Tibetan friends that they do look and behave quite different to me.
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 148992Unread post Gary Oak »

I really hope that my Tibetan friends are still alive. I wish I could get them into Canada.

Murdering and beating ethnic Mongolians and Tibetans by Beijing, MUST STOP

http://chinawatchcanada.blogspot.ca/201 ... lians.html
User avatar
Blue Frost
SUPER VIP
SUPER VIP
Posts: 98502
Joined: May 14th, 2012, 1:01 am
Location: Yodenheim

Re: Tibet

Post: # 149249Unread post Blue Frost »

I don't know how people would stop it, they would need a major revolt, and a lot more people.
Before travel bans, and big borders long ago they would just move away, migrate.
"Being alone isn't what hurts. It's when the people around you make you feel alone" ~ Naruto Uzumaki, an Anime Character
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Tibet

Post: # 168189Unread post Gary Oak »

No doubt a lot of secret work or research has been done on the bodies found with these Dropa Stones. Was any facial reconstruction done ? I wonder what they looked like. I read about these stones when I was a boy. Have they translated them ? They were discovered in 1938 in the Himalayas. The translation that they came down from the clouds in an aircraft is interesting. No doubt DNA tests have been done on the bodies.

The Mysterious Dropa Stones

https://www.ancient-origins.net/unexpla ... tion-00877

Image

30 September, 2013 - 11:40 aprilholloway
The Mysterious Dropa Stones – Fact or Fiction?



The Dropa stones are said to be a set of 716 circular stone disks dating back 12,000 years on which tiny hieroglyphic-like markings can be found. Each disc is said to measure up to 1 foot in diameter and carry two grooves, originating from a hole in their centre, in the form of a double spiral.

The discovery of the mysterious discs apparently took place in 1938 in the mountains of Baian Kara-Ula on the border between China and Tibet, where a Chinese professor, Chi Pu Tei, detected regularly aligned rows of graves. The skeletons measured only around four feet in height and had skulls which were large and over developed.

Inside a nearby cave system, Chi Pu Tei and his team found interesting rock art which depicted figures with round helmets. Engraved in the rock were also the sun, moon, earth and stars, connected by groups of pea-sized dots. Further inside the cave, the team found the collection of stone discs, most of them half buried in the floor of the cave.

Tsum Um Nui

For the next two decades, it is believed that the discs were labelled and stored at Beijing University before being given to Tsum Um Nui for study in 1958. Tsum Um Nui allegedly managed to decipher the hieroglyphic characters after 4 years of study which he claimed told the story of a spacecraft that crash landed in the area of the cave and that the ship contained the Dropa people. One of the discs apparently said the following: "The Dropa came down from the clouds in their aircraft. Our men, women and children hid in the caves ten times before sunrise. When at last we understood the sign language of the Dropas, we realized that the newcomers had peaceful intentions".

Tsum Um Nui is said to have published his findings 1962 in a professional journal, and was subsequently ridiculed and met with disbelief. Shortly afterwards he is said to have gone to Japan in a self-imposed exile where he died not long after he completed the manuscript of his work.

Russian Involvement

in 1968 the Dropa stones apparently came to the attention of W. Saitsew (also spelt Zaitsev), a Russian scientist who re-published the findings of Tsum Um Nui and conducted tests on the disks that revealed some very peculiar properties. Physically, the granite stones contained high concentrations of cobalt and other metals - a very hard stone indeed that would have made it difficult for the primitive people to carve the lettering, especially with such minute characters. As recorded in the Soviet magazine Sputnik, when testing a disk with an oscillograph, a surprising oscillation rhythm was recorded as if, the scientists said, they had once been electrically charged or had functioned as electrical conductors.

Wegerer
Image
Dropa StonesSupposedly, Ernst Wegerer (Wegener) was an Austrian engineer who, in 1974, visited the Banpo Museum in Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, where he was able to see two of the Dropa stones. It is said that when he enquired about the discs the manager did not provide him with any information but allowed him to photograph them. He claims that in his photos the hieroglyphs cannot be seen as they have been hidden by the flash from the camera and have also deteriorated.

In 1994, the German scientist Hartwig Hausdorf and colleague Peter Krassa, are said to have visited China and the Banpo museum in Xian in 1994, where they were told that the Director's superiors had ordered the discs destroyed and that officially they do not recognise their existence. Hausdorf found out that the Chinese government do not have any official record of a tribe called Dropa, neither in the local area of Qinghai or whatsoever in China.

Have any of the Dropa people survived?

At the time of the discovery, the cave area was still inhabited by two tribes known as the Hams and the Dropas. Anthropologists have apparently been unable to categorize either tribe into any other known race; they are neither Chinese, Mongol nor Tibetan. They are yellow-skinned with thin bodies and disproportionately large heads, corresponding to the skeletal remains found in the caves in 1938. They have sparse hair on their bodies, have large eyes and their height measures between 3’6” and 4’7” with an average height of 4’2”.

Controversies

The Dropa stones are immersed in controversy with many claiming that it is nothing but a hoax. Among the arguments against their existence are the following:

It has been claimed that Tsum Um Nui is not a real Chinese name. There is no mention of him in China outside of his connection to the Dropa stones. According to Dropa enthusiast Hartwig Hausdorf, Tsum Um Nui is a former Japanese name, but adapted to the Chinese language.

The vast majority of names and sources cannot be corroborated and existence the Soviet or Chinese scholars cannot be found.

While reported to be a tribe of people with pygmy stature, the real Dropas are said to be nomadic herders who inhabit most of the northern Tibetan Plateau and who have regular height.

The only photos of the stone discs do not show any evidence of the hieroglyphs and display a similarity to Bi discs, which are round jade discs dating to around 3000 BC, common in the Shaanxi Province.

It seems unlikely that a scholar was able to decipher and understand a completely unknown language in 4 years. Deciphering ancient writings has usually taken decades for multiple teams of expert linguists and this is even when they can be linked to another known language.

The stone discs were said to have been stored in various museums across China. However, none of these museums have any records or traces of Dropa stone ever being there.

Fact or Fiction?

Are the Dropa stones and the accompanying story simply part of an elaborate hoax or a fanciful story? Or were hundreds of discs with evidence of extra-terrestrial visitation to Earth really discovered, and the facts surrounding the case covered up?
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Tibet

Post: # 168240Unread post Gary Oak »

About thirty seconds into this video you can see a photo of one of these short bodies with large heads and frail skeletons



10 Unsolved Mysteries of Tibet

User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Tibet

Post: # 180114Unread post Gary Oak »

User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 185619Unread post Gary Oak »

Tibetan girls have a unique personality and charm.
User avatar
Gary Oak
VIP Member
VIP Member
Posts: 10150
Joined: June 25th, 2012, 5:32 pm

Re: Tibet

Post: # 189282Unread post Gary Oak »

It’s now been discovered that Tibet was once populated by denisovans. As I posted on this thread previously Tibetans have a high amount of denisovan DNA. https://www.businessinsider.com/denisov ... -ol25PMvpQ
Post Reply