The Tyburn Tree executions.

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GranpaP
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The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 29 May 2013, 18:25

Tyburn was a village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch in present-day London. It took its name from the Tyburn or Teo Bourne 'boundary stream', a tributary of the River Thames. For many centuries, the name was synonymous with capital punishment, its having been the principal place for execution of London criminals and convicted traitors, including many religious martyrs.

The first recorded execution took place at a site next to the stream in 1196. William Fitz Osbern, the populist leader of the poor of London, was cornered in the church of St Mary le Bow. He was dragged naked behind a horse to Tyburn, where he was hanged.

In 1571, the Tyburn Tree was erected near the modern Marble Arch. The "Tree" or "Triple Tree" was a novel form of gallows, comprising a horizontal wooden triangle supported by three legs (an arrangement known as a "three-legged mare" or "three-legged stool"). Several felons could thus be hanged at once, and so the gallows were used for mass executions, such as on 23 June 1649 when 24 prisoners – 23 men and one woman – were hanged simultaneously.

Among the more notable individuals suspended from the "Tree" in the following centuries were John Bradshaw, Henry Ireton and Oliver Cromwell, who were already dead but were disinterred and hanged at Tyburn in January 1661 on the orders of the Cavalier Parliament in an act of posthumous revenge for their part in the beheading of King Charles I.

The executions were public spectacles and proved extremely popular, attracting crowds of thousands. The enterprising villagers of Tyburn erected large spectator stands so that as many as possible could see the hangings (for a fee). On one occasion, the stands collapsed, reportedly killing and injuring hundreds of people. This did not prove a deterrent, however, and the executions continued to be treated as public holidays, with London apprentices being given the day off for them.

On 19 April 1779, clergyman James Hackman was hanged there following his 7 April murder of courtesan and socialite Martha Ray, his former lover, and the mistress of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.

The Tyburn gallows were last used on 3 November 1783, when John Austin, a highwayman, was hanged. The site of the gallows is now marked by three brass triangles mounted on the pavement on an island in the middle of Edgware Road at its junction with Bayswater Road.

Image

source: Wikipedia




Dean
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Dean » 29 May 2013, 21:18

GranpaP wrote:Tyburn was a village in the county of Middlesex close to the current location of Marble Arch in present-day London. It took its name from the Tyburn or Teo Bourne 'boundary stream', a tributary of the River Thames. For many centuries, the name was synonymous with capital punishment, its having been the principal place for execution of London criminals and convicted traitors, including many religious martyrs.

The first recorded execution took place at a site next to the stream in 1196. William Fitz Osbern, the populist leader of the poor of London, was cornered in the church of St Mary le Bow. He was dragged naked behind a horse to Tyburn, where he was hanged.

In 1571, the Tyburn Tree was erected near the modern Marble Arch. The "Tree" or "Triple Tree" was a novel form of gallows, comprising a horizontal wooden triangle supported by three legs (an arrangement known as a "three-legged mare" or "three-legged stool"). Several felons could thus be hanged at once, and so the gallows were used for mass executions, such as on 23 June 1649 when 24 prisoners – 23 men and one woman – were hanged simultaneously.

Among the more notable individuals suspended from the "Tree" in the following centuries were John Bradshaw, Henry Ireton and Oliver Cromwell, who were already dead but were disinterred and hanged at Tyburn in January 1661 on the orders of the Cavalier Parliament in an act of posthumous revenge for their part in the beheading of King Charles I.

The executions were public spectacles and proved extremely popular, attracting crowds of thousands. The enterprising villagers of Tyburn erected large spectator stands so that as many as possible could see the hangings (for a fee). On one occasion, the stands collapsed, reportedly killing and injuring hundreds of people. This did not prove a deterrent, however, and the executions continued to be treated as public holidays, with London apprentices being given the day off for them.

On 19 April 1779, clergyman James Hackman was hanged there following his 7 April murder of courtesan and socialite Martha Ray, his former lover, and the mistress of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich.

The Tyburn gallows were last used on 3 November 1783, when John Austin, a highwayman, was hanged. The site of the gallows is now marked by three brass triangles mounted on the pavement on an island in the middle of Edgware Road at its junction with Bayswater Road.

Image
The jail down the road that used to hold the condemned is now a pub. It used to be named the Mason's Arm's (I think that has changed) and a tunnel ran the length of the street to an area underneath where the condemned would come up and then be hanged.

http://www.beerintheevening.com/pubs/s/ ... Marylebone

It was a good pub in the day.

I took this from another site....

It has a history of being a holding place (in the cellar) for prisoners who were on their way to be hanged nearby at Marble Arch at the Tyburn Tree (a wooden tri-legged gallow, not a real tree), built in 1571. Therefore, the pub is known to be haunted.
(Per Wikipedia).... As history tells it, the British were very into public hangings/executions. They actually paid fees to watch hangings in Tyburn, a small village in Middlesex, what is now known as the Marble Arch area in London. These public spectacles drew thousands. The Tyburn Tree's last hanging was in 1783 and 3 brass triangles on the pavement now mark the site.



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Lochdubh
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Lochdubh » 30 May 2013, 10:23

thanks for posting this. I've heard references to the "tree" since late childhood, but had never read about it's configuration or history. Next time I'm in London, I'll look for cc and Extryleggs at Speaker's corner, then look for the 3 brass triangles before having a pint in the haunted pub.



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 30 May 2013, 12:53

At the hands of hangmen like the notorious Jack Ketch, it's estimated 50,000 criminals, some no older than nine years old, did the Tyburn Jig in in the six centuries the site was used for public executions. Jack Ketch was hangman from 1663 to 1686.

The condemned scaled a ladder placed against the gallows beam and there was jeered by the public while Ketch cinched the noose. Carts replaced the ladder during that century. With nooses hanging loose around their necks, prisoners were trundled by cart to Tyburn Hill as crowds along the route cracked jokes, partied, drank and pelted them with offal. Arriving at the gallows, the prisoners were strung-up by Ketch who then whipped the horse-drawn cart away so they could 'jig' on air.

Tyburn's Triple Tree had three gallows beams. Cart after cart could be emptied with ease. Often the condemned's bowels and bladder let go, so Ketch was also known as the 'crap merchant'. Those who really pissed-off the Crown were hanged, drawn and quartered. Ketch would hang them by the neck until they weren't dead, then cut them down and rip them open so he could draw out their bowels and roast them in front of their eyes. To finish, he would hack the head off and butcher the rest into quarters. The four pieces, stuck on poles, were displayed around London as a warning. The severed head was a trophy to mount on Traitor's Gate.

So hated was the hangman that Ketch himself was hanged in Punch and Judy shows. Children were kept quiet with threats of "Jack Ketch will get you". The last witch, Alice Molland, was hanged in Britain in 1685 one year before Ketch died.



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Lochdubh
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Lochdubh » 30 May 2013, 13:17

While the "crap merchant" and his ilk saw off the common miscreants, more aristocratic prisoners met their fate at the Tower until at least the middle of the 18th century. In 1745-46 Scotland and Northern England were wracked by the jacobite Rebellion, the final attempt of the Stuart dynasty to recover control of the United Kingdom. Scots fought ferociously on both sides and Jacobite cavalry officer Lord Balmerino was among the upper class supports of "Charlie" to be condemned to death by beheading. Quite old school.

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/charles/100.htm



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 30 May 2013, 13:24

The Tyburn Jig was replaced by the Bailey's Ballroom Dance after the last Tyburn execution in 1783 and the scaffold was moved in front of the Newgate prison in Old Bailey, now the name of London's Central Criminal Court.



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 30 May 2013, 13:53

Another Tyburn hangman of the time was John Crossland who found his vocation in a very unusual way.

A father and his two sons were tried and convicted of horse thievery at Derby Assizes. Gallows humor ruled sentencing that day, so the judges offered to pardon one of the three men if he would consent to hang the other two.

The offer was made to the father first who indignantly refused stating he would not put to death the life he gave and would rather be hung one hundred times.

The offer was then made to the eldest son who also refused on the basis he would not be able to live with himself if he hanged his own family.

The offer was made to the younger son and John accepted at once. So fine a job he did of hanging his father and brother that John Crossland went on to become hangman for several counties, an office he held to a ripe old age.



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Lochdubh » 30 May 2013, 14:04

:(



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 30 May 2013, 18:03

Lochdubh wrote:While the "crap merchant" and his ilk saw off the common miscreants, more aristocratic prisoners met their fate at the Tower until at least the middle of the 18th century. In 1745-46 Scotland and Northern England were wracked by the jacobite Rebellion, the final attempt of the Stuart dynasty to recover control of the United Kingdom. Scots fought ferociously on both sides and Jacobite cavalry officer Lord Balmerino was among the upper class supports of "Charlie" to be condemned to death by beheading. Quite old school.

http://www.electricscotland.com/history/charles/100.htm

On the scaffold on 15 July 1685, James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, addressing Ketch, referred to his treatment of Lord Russell, thus disconcerting him, stating "Here are six guineas for you. Do not hack me as you did my Lord Russell. I have heard that you struck him three or four times. My servant will give you some more gold if you do the work well." The duke subsequently undressed and felt the edge of the axe expressing some fear that it was not sharp enough, and laid his head on the block.

The first blow dealt by Ketch inflicted only a slight wound after which the Duke struggled, rose from the block, and looked reproachfully at the executioner before sinking down once more. Ketch struck the duke twice more, but still the neck was not severed, and the body continued to move.

Yells of rage and horror rose from the on-looking crowd to which Ketch flung down the axe with a curse and stated that "I cannot do it, my heart fails me." The sheriff present asked Ketch to "Take up the axe, man" to which Ketch responded by once more taking up the axe and dealing two more blows to the duke, killing him. Still, the head remained attached and Ketch used a butcher's knife from the sheath on his hip to cut the last sinew and flesh that prevented the head from dropping.

The crowd was so enraged that Ketch had to be escorted away under strong guard.

Source: Wikipedia.



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Glasgogirl » 30 May 2013, 22:45

Gawd what a bloodthirsty time....... Glasgow has it's own 'Gallowgate' where the 'gallows' lived long ago.....



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 01 Jun 2013, 12:43

The custom in those times was that the hangman owned the victim's clothes and the rope used to hang him. Jack Ketch made a pretty penny off the prerequisites of his office. He sold the garments of those he hanged to Madame Tussaud's waxworks and other exhibits. The notoriety of the convict put to death determined the price it cost relic hunters for a piece of the rope, sometimes as much as five shillings an inch.



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Lochdubh » 05 Nov 2019, 16:16

Monsieur de Paris....le Bourreau.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0gn4mUET1A



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 05 Nov 2019, 16:20

Lochdubh wrote:
05 Nov 2019, 16:16
Monsieur de Paris....le Bourreau.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0gntmUET1A
video unavailable. :(



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Lochdubh
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Lochdubh » 05 Nov 2019, 16:21

Sorry, Sir...fixed now.



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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by GranpaP » 05 Nov 2019, 16:59

Lochdubh wrote:
05 Nov 2019, 16:21
Sorry, Sir...fixed now.


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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by asal » 06 Nov 2019, 15:45

Lochdubh wrote:
05 Nov 2019, 16:16
Monsieur de Paris....le Bourreau.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0gn4mUET1A
Louis Congo - the first freed slave in New Orleans. He was granted freedom on the condition that he first serve as an executioner and torturer at Jackson Square (in front of the St. Louis Cathedral):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Congo
Louis Congo was an African slave who was freed in 1725 from the Company of the Indies by Louisiana officials and who was appointed public executioner.[1][2] He served in this office for at least twelve years, and was granted the authority to execute punishments to not only fellow Africans, but also white settlers.[1] During this time, he was given charge of performing whippings, brandings, amputations, torture, and hangings.[1]
https://narratively.com/the-former-slav ... ecutioner/


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Lochdubh
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Lochdubh » 06 Nov 2019, 17:46

Wonder what Jackson Square was called pre 1815?



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asal
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by asal » 06 Nov 2019, 19:25

Lochdubh wrote:
06 Nov 2019, 17:46
Wonder what Jackson Square was called pre 1815?
Place d'Armes. I learned today that the Spanish would perform military marches in the square.
What today is known as Jackson Square, at the heart of New Orleans' French Quarter, was known in the 19th century as the Place d'Armes -- the traditional town square where important ceremonies and parades were held. During the New Orleans campaign of the War of 1812, American Major General Andrw Jackson made use of the square that would later bear his name.
https://www.nps.gov/places/places-darmes.htm
Early French colonial New Orleans was centered on what was then called the Place d'Armes (lit. "weapons' square"). Under Spanish colonial administration in the second half of the 18th century, the name was Plaza de Armas. Following the Great New Orleans Fire of 1788, the Spanish officials rebuilt the St. Louis Church (elevated to cathedral in 1793) in 1789 and the town hall (known as the Cabildo) in 1795.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_S ... w_Orleans)

The Cabildo is where the Louisiana Purchase was signed.


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Lochdubh
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by Lochdubh » 07 Nov 2019, 14:25

Thanks toots!

:cool: :wub:



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asal
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Re: The Tyburn Tree executions.

Unread post by asal » 07 Nov 2019, 17:26

Lochdubh wrote:
07 Nov 2019, 14:25
Thanks toots!

:cool: :wub:
:tongue: no problem toots


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